Calendar Details

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Thursday, January 30

Recent Results from the LUX Dark Matter Experiment

Kevin O'Sullivan, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
Physics Division Seminar
3:00 PM — 4:00 PM, Building 6008, Large Conference Room
Contact: Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri (Uribarri@ornl.gov), 865.574.6124

Abstract

Evidence from galactic rotation curves, gravitational lensing, the cosmic microwave background, and other cosmological studies point to the existence of exotic non-luminous matter, referred to as dark matter. In spite of the strong indirect evidence for the existence of dark matter, it's composition remains unknown. One of the most promising putative dark matter candidates are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) which would be observable through theirs scatters with ordinary matter. Currently several searches for WIMPs see tentative signals which are yet to be confirmed by other experiments. The LUX experiment searches for WIMPs using a large, two-phase Xenon detector operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first science run of LUX consisted of 85.3 live days with 118 kg of fiducial mass. A pro file-likelihood analysis of the data shows consistency with the background-only hypothesis, allowing a 90% confidence limit to be set on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of 7.6x10^46 cm^2 at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c2. This result is in conflict with putative signals light WIMP from CDMS II and CoGent.