Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
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September 2012
Thursday, September 20, 2012

Becky Ashe, Principal of Knoxville STEM Academy
A New Paradigm for STEM education in Knox County Schools (and beyond)

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20.00
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Becky Ashe, Principal of Knoxville STEM Academy - A New Paradigm for STEM education in Knox County Schools (and beyond)

Abstract - Learn about Knoxville's newest high school model - a platform school in the Battelle-sponsored Tennessee STEM Innovation Network, the L&N STEM Academy. The principal will share the school's founding design principles, unique technologies, and how lessons learned at the L&N will impact classrooms around the East TN region.

Bio - Mrs. Ashe is a product of Knox County Schools (West High) and the University of TN at Knoxville. She holds a B.S. and M.S. from UT in Science Education and Curriculum with a minor in Zoology. She also has an EdS from Lincoln Memorial University in Administration and Supervision. She was at West High for 14 years as a biology, chemistry, and ecology teacher; where she was awarded West's first ever Teacher of the Year award, as well as a Phi Delta Kappan recognition as high school teacher of the year. During her tenure at West, Mrs. Ashe was a scholar in residence for the National Institutes of Health at UT over two summers where she participated in invertebrate marine animal research and mark and recapture studies on endangered birds in the Waikamoi rainforest on the side of Haleakalah volcano on Maui. She also spent a quarter as a Teacher at Sea in Prince William Sound aboard a NOAA research vessel. Since leaving the classroom, Mrs. Ashe has served Knox County as a Science Specialist and Supervisor, and Executive Director of Curriculum and Instruction, before being appointed as the first principal of the L&N STEM Academy and Knox County Schools STEM Coordinator (simultaneously) in 2010. She is married (26 years) to an Assistant Principal of the STEM Academy at Hardin Valley Academy, George, and is proud mother to Buck, who recently completed his B.S. in Engineering Physics at UT.

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October 2012
Thursday, October 25, 2012

Tom Irwin
Program Manager, Tennessee Valley Authority Commercial and Industrial Distributor Delivery
TVA's Energy Right Solutions Program

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Tom Irwin, Program Manager, Tennessee Valley Authority Commercial and Industrial Distributor Delivery - TVA's Energy Right Solutions Program

Abstract – A review of all of TVA’s energy efficiency programs offered under the Energy Right Solutions Program will be presented. Details of this program can be found at: TVA Energy Right Solutions.

TVA’s Energy Right Solutions offers a variety of programs to help home, business and industrial customers save energy and money. Helping our customers use energy wisely and efficiently is the right thing to do. In today’s global economy, helping businesses remain efficient is vitally important. Increased efficiency helps keep costs lower for everyone and helps to ensure that existing jobs remain here in our area. It also makes our area more competitive for future plant expansions and even more jobs. Add these benefits to the avoided cost of additional power plant capacity and it becomes clear that TVA’s Energy Right Solutions Program is a win-win for all parties concerned.

Bio - Tom Irwin is the Program Manager for TVA’s Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency and Demand Response efforts here in east Tennessee. His work involves the promotion and implementation of energy efficiency and demand response programs in the commercial and industrial sectors of northeast Tennessee from Bristol, VA to the north and Lenoir City and Harriman to the south.

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November 2012
Thursday, November 15, 2012

Joseph McBride
PhD candidate in biomedical engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Diagnostics for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer’s Disease

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Joseph McBride, PhD candidate in biomedical engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Diagnostics for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer’s Disease

Abstract - Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cause similar cognitive degeneration including progressive memory loss, shrinking vocabulary and lower ability to execute precise motor movements. MCI is currently detected based on self/family-reported behavioral histories and some more objective measures, but typically not in the primary care setting. By the time primary care providers detect significant changes, the patient has often progressed to AD and it is too late for effective treatment. Currently, the most definitive means for diagnosing AD is determination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker proteins; this, however, requires patients to undergo a lumbar puncture, a painful and potentially dangerous procedure. This study explores a convenient, noninvasive alternative to current methods using scalp EEG for detection of MCI and AD at early stages. Resting EEG records from 46 age-matched subjects (mean age 75.6)—15 normal controls (NC), 16 MCI, and 15 with early stage AD—are examined. Dynamic spectral and entropy features are computed and used as features in a support vector machine (SVM) model to discriminate between the three groups. Analyses demonstrate discrimination accuracies of 93.55% for MCI vs. NC, 90% for AD vs. NC, and 87.10% for AD vs. MCI. These results suggest the potential of scalp EEG as an efficacious method for noninvasive diagnosis of MCI and early AD.

Bio - Joseph McBride is a PhD candidate in biomedical engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK). He received his bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering from UTK and is currently working as a research assistant in the Nonlinear Biodynamics Laboratory of the Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering Department at UTK. His dissertation research focuses on the development of a convenient, noninvasive method of using scalp EEG for detection of dementia and other neurological disorders. In addition to his research, he also teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in dynamics, mechanics, and experimental design and instrumentation at UTK.

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December 2012
Thursday, December 6, 2012

Dr. Stuart Daw
Corporate Fellow, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Marks on the Wall: An Exploration of the Cultural History of Cumberland Gap Cave

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menue
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Stuart Daw, Corporate Fellow, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, - Marks on the Wall: An Exploration of the Cultural History of Cumberland Gap Cave

Abstract - Besides being a long-time ChE, Stuart Daw has been a cave explorer and member of the National Speleological Society for over 40 years. He is currently active in a multi-year project organized by the Cave Research Foundation (CRF) at Cumberland Gap National Historic Park. This project involves extensive mapping of the Cumberland Gap Cave system and other caves in the national park that straddles the boundaries of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia. One of Stuart’s primary interests in the CRF Gap Project has been to help document the extensive record of human interactions with Gap Cave and its immediate surroundings. He will present examples of some of the cultural ‘artifacts’ being discovered by the CRF Project and share his thoughts about the importance of cultural surveys in caves and future opportunities for anthropological research in the unique speleological environment of Gap Cave.

Bio - C. Stuart Daw, P.E. a native of Florida, received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Florida and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from the University of Tennessee. He is currently a Distinguished R&D Staff Member in the Engineering Science and Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and an adjunct faculty member in both Chemical and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Tennessee. He has worked at ORNL since 1979, primarily in combustion, waste treatment, emissions control, and applications of chaos theory. Prior to that time he was employed by DuPont where he specialized in chemical reactor modeling and process development. Dr. Daw has over 130 publications on combustion, multi-phase transport phenomena, chemical reactor modeling, catalysis, and nonlinear dynamics. Dr. Daw is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Combustion Institute, the ORNL representative to the American Flame Research Committee, and a former member of the Board of Advisors of the Central States Section of the Combustion Institute. He currently is a co-leader of the DOE Crosscut Lean Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulation (CLEERS) activity of the DOE Diesel Crosscut Team.

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January 2013 - CANCELLED DUE TO WINTER STORM
Thrusday, January 17, 2013

Dr. Kevin Hoyt and Dr. William Brown
The University of Tennessee
Planned Study of Hydraulic Fracturing in Tennessee

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Kevin Hoyt and Dr. William Brown, The University of Tennessee, Planned Study of Hydraulic Fracturing in Tennessee

Abstract - The University of Tennessee (UT) is making plans to lease land in its research forest in Morgan and Scott counties to oil and gas exploration companies, in order to study the effects of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in Tennessee. The Cumberland Forest, established in 1947, is the largest field research unit in the UT Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center, encompassing 8,000 acres of Cumberland Mountain forest land in Morgan and Scott counties. This forest facilitates several large- and small-scale forest and wildlife management research projects, as well as ecological demonstration projects. The Cumberland Forest is also the site of some of the earliest stripmine reclamation research in Tennessee. UT plans to award a contract, through a bidding process, early next year to lease land to a company for oil and gas exploration and production. Royalties from any production would be used by UT to finance research into how fracking affects surrounding wildlife, geology, and air and water quality.

Bio - Dr. Kevin Hoyt is the Director of the Forest Resources AgResearch and Education Center. Dr. William Brown is the Dean for Research & Director of the Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station.

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February 2013
Thursday, February 21, 2013

Dr. Michael Smith
Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distinguished Scientist
Exploding Stars and Atom Smashers

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu items
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Michael Smith, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distinguished Scientist - Exploding Stars and Atom Smashers

Abstract - The night sky appears calm and peaceful – but is actually peppered with energetic explosions that rip apart the stars. What causes some stars to explode, while others just fizzle out and fade away? How are stellar blasts related to the origin of the elements? Find out how we use atom smashers here on Earth to unlock these mysteries of exploding stars. Some of the bizarre effects discussed include cosmic cannibalism, thermonuclear traffic jams, and stellar alchemy.

Bio - Dr. Michael Smith is a Distinguished Scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he leads the Experimental Astrophysics Group. Prior to coming to ORNL, he received an undergraduate degree in Physics from the University of Chicago, a Ph.D. from Yale University, and worked as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. At ORNL, he leads an effort using beams of radioactive subatomic nuclei and computer simulations to study how stars explode. He also carries out research into how our Universe began in a hot Big Bang. He has won the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest award given to young researchers in the United States, as well as numerous ORNL awards including Scientific Paper of the Year, Science Communicator of the Year, and Educational Champion. He has been featured on National Geographic's Naked Science TV show, the JASON science education project, and the Discovery Channel / Siemens STEM Online Academy. He has pioneered and oversees 6 online software systems and websites that enable scientists from around the world to share their research results. He is Chairman of the 1200 member user group of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, and enjoys mentoring students of all levels.

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March 2013 - Joint with ASM
Thursday, March 21, 2013

Ms. Lee McGetrick
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
ORNL Advanced Manufacturing: The Future of Carbon Fiber

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu items
7:00 p.m. Program - Ms. Lee McGetrick, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - ORNL Advanced Manufacturing: The Future of Carbon Fiber
Abstract - While U.S. innovation in new manufacturing technologies remains strong, access to cutting-edge materials R&D and facilities is unattainable for most companies. Manufacturing is a major component of the U.S. economy, and in order to “win the race” in this global economy we must invest in programs to facilitate commercialization of new technologies. ORNL has been leading several initiatives in advanced materials and manufacturing with a focus on pushing technology into the private sector. One the most prominent of those initiatives is in the area of carbon fiber and composites, where ORNL’s research portfolio has matured to the point that the DOE has invested over $34M in the new Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF). This presentation will provide an overview of the R&D focus areas in carbon fiber and will include a “virtual tour” of the CFTF along with a discussion of how the CFTF can be used as a national asset for growing the carbon fiber and composites industry.

Bio - Ms. McGetrick has over 25 years of management-level experience in plant operations, process engineering, and project management.

Ms. McGetrick spent the first 15 years of her career at the Y-12 National Security Complex in weapons manufacturing and nuclear operations. Ms. McGetrick then worked for Washington Group International (now URS Washington) where she was Site Manager at the West Valley Demonstration Project and later a regional manager for Business Development with Washington Group. Ms. McGetrick joined UT-Battelle in 2007 where she served as the Directorate Operations Manager for Nuclear Operations. She is now serving as the Director for ORNL’s Carbon Fiber Technology Facility, where she is responsible for the installation and commissioning of the facility as well integration of research projects and program development activities associated with ORNL’s low-cost carbon fiber portfolio.

Ms. McGetrick holds a degree in Industrial Engineering from the University of Tennessee.

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April 2013
Thursday, April 18, 2013

Dr. Robert Hatcher
University of Tennessee Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Oil and Gas Resources in Tennessee

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - TBD
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Robert Hatcher, University of Tennessee Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Oil and Gas Resources in Tennessee

Abstract - The Tennessee oil and gas industry produces <1 million barrels of oil/yr and similar small amounts of natural gas. Despite the small size of the industry, a number of people make their livings from it. The principal oil and gas producing area has been Overton, Pickett, Fentress, Morgan, and Campbell Counties, with a field in Hancock County. Other regions remain underexplored, however, so the future for production in Tennessee is promising. Hydrocarbons in Tennessee originate in three “petroleum systems:” sedimentary rock sequences that contain a source, pathways for hydrocarbon migration, and traps where hydrocarbons may survive for long periods of geologic time. The oldest system involves an algal source in carbonate rocks with traps in younger limestone. The second involves a source in the organic-rich Chattanooga Shale (Marcellus equivalent) and traps in still younger crinoid reefs and limestone. The third system is the coal-bearing rocks of the Plateau, which produce no oil and noncommercial amounts of methane. The two primary petroleum systems provide four current options for exploration: conventional vertical drilling into the (1) older or (2) younger limestones, and horizontal drilling and fracking of the (3) Chattanooga Shale or the (4) crinoid reefs just above it. Horizontal drilling and fracking are options for all potential exploration targets. While the greater depths of production targets in West Virginia and Pennsylvania require fracking using liquids, shallower targets in Tennessee and southern Kentucky permit fracking with nitrogen, which lessens the chance of groundwater contamination. Primary sources of fracking-related contamination arise from: poor handling of liquids on the surface, and poor cementing of casings (leaving cracks or voids). Fractures propagate only short distances from fracked regions in horizontal drillholes. Most of the demonstrations of flaming gas from water faucets sensationalized by the media have been shown using stable isotope studies to have near-surface origins from organic matter, not deep hydrocarbons.

Bio - Dr. Robert Hatcher is a Distinguished Scientist and Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee. His research goal is to gain a better understanding of the evolution of continental crust, mostly through the study of mountain chains and mature crust. While Dr. Hatcher is a structural geologist, most of his research is interdisciplinary, integrating stratigraphic, geochronologic, geochemical, and geophysical data into structural studies. He is primarily a field geologist, however, and field data form the basis for all other supporting studies. Dr Hatcher graduated with a B.A from Vanderbilt University in 1961 and with a Ph. D. from the University of Tennessee in 1965. He has previously worked at Humble Oil and Refining Company (1965–66), Clemson University (1966-78, Assistant Professor to Full Professor), Florida State University (1978-80, Full Professor), University of South Carolina (1980-86, Full Professor), and University of Tennessee-Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distinguished Scientist (1986–2000). He is the author or co-author of >200 scientific publications, including 9 books.

 
April 2013
Thursday, April 25, 2013

Student Awards Banquet
UT Under Graduate Student Project Teams
2013 UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Dinner

Location: Calhoun's on the River, Knoxville, TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
6:00 p.m. Cash Bar in CBE Banquet Area
6:30 p.m. Program - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Banquet
7:30 p.m. Dinner - Menu
Grilled Chicken Teriyaki Served over Rice
Hickory Smoked Pulled Pork with BBQ Sauce
Sautéed Mixed Vegetables
Spinach Maria
Stuffed Baked Potatoes
Double Chocolate Cake
Italian Cream Cake

Abstract - The annual UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering student awards banquet will be held at Calhoun’s on the River on April 25, 2013. Traditionally, two student teams are chosen from CBE 411 projects class to present their research or design projects.

This is an excellent opportunity to see the types of research young chemical engineers are performing.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.
RSVP to Rita Gray (rgray22@utk.edu)

by
Thursday, April 18, 2013

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May 2013 - Joint with SWE
Thursday, May 16, 2013

Dr. Jan Simek
Department of Anthropology , University of Tennessee
The Sky Above, the Mud Below - McClung Museum

Location: Frank H. McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN - Park along the circle drive in front of the museum (just across from the torchbearer statue). No parking passes are needed. Come in the front door, and a guard will be available to direct you to the correct location.
Dinner location - McClung Museum
Cost: $5
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Pizza and soft drinks at the Museum
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Jan Simek, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee The Sky Above, the Mud Below - McClung Museum

Abstract - Dr. Jan Simek will give a presentation on ancient cave paintings at the McClung Museum on the UT campus. This presentation will look at prehistoric art in the Southeast of North America, with a particular focus on painted images on rock outcrops and in caves. Variability in chronology, subject matter, geographical context, and pigment chemistry will be discussed as these relate to cultural variation in the past.

Bio - Dr. Simek is an American archaeologist and educator and was the interim president of the University of Tennessee from 2009-2010. As a faculty member in the department of anthropology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, his research interests include Paleolithic archaeology, human evolution, quantitative analysis, spatial analysis, archaeology of the southeastern United States, and cave archaeology. He has been involved in the discovery and exploration of numerous “Unnamed Caves”, a naming practice used to protect their location, in the Cumberland Plateau for the past fifteen years. He has been instrumental in the discovery of prehistoric artwork; dating back thousands of years and has also conducted important research in France at Neanderthal habitation sites.

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For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive.