Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
Calendar of Events
AugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayArchive

<

September 2016
Thursday, September 22, 2016

Lonnie Love
Corporate Fellow and Group Leader of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Systems Research Group
Creating Disruptions in Automotive Manufacturing

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Lonnie Love, Corporate Fellow and Group Leader of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Systems Research Group - Creating Disruptions in Automotive Manufacturing
Abstract - Conventional automotive manufacturing has experienced a number of disruptions. First was Henry Ford’s advent of the assembly line which introduced the efficiencies of mass production. In the 1970’s and 80’s, the automotive industry began integrating robotics into the assembly line which increased quality control and flexibility. Could we be seeing the advent of a new disruption in automotive manufacturing with the advent of the 3D printed car? Traditional 3D printing has been limited to small size, low production rate systems that could have an impact on components but have never been considered for mass production. The introduction of Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) is leading to new paradigms in automotive production. What happens if a car can be reduced from requiring the assembly of 20,000 parts down to under 100 parts? What happens if a single printer can print the majority of the part in less than 8 hours? Is the future of automotive manufacturing based on a decentralized model where car dealerships can make cars? What are the major research hurdles in terms of materials and design? This talk will describe recent work at ORNL in terms of manufacturing and the impact it could have on the future of automotive manufacturing.

Bio - Lonnie Love, Ph.D., is a Corporate Fellow and Group Leader of Dr. Lonnie Love Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Manufacturing Systems Research Group. He received his Ph. D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1995. He is the project lead for the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) program at ORNL that is focusing on large scale, high speed composite additive manufacturing that is now being commercialized by Cincinnati Incorporated. His team has demonstrated the technology on a number of high profile projects including the first 3D printed car (the Strati with Local Motors), the printed Cobra for the Department of Energy as well as high speed, low cost tooling for Boeing and Ford. Lonnie was ORNL’s 2014 Distinguished Research Scientist, 2009 Inventor of the year, has over 30 invention disclosures and patents and 125 peer reviewed publications. He serves on the scientific advisory board for NSF’s Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power.

Back to top

 
October 2016
Thursday, October 20, 2016

Brian West
Deputy Director of the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s National Transportation Research Center
Fuels R&D Supporting Informed Decision-Making

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Brian West, Deputy Director of the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s National Transportation Research Center, Fuels R&D Supporting Informed Decision-Making



Abstract - TOak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long history in fuels R&D; with an early focus only on energy security, then cleaner emissions, the more recent directive includes equal if not more significant emphasis on greenhouse gas emissions reductions. While national labs do not make policy, our research often informs policy decisions. This presentation will describe some of the ORNL fuel research over the years, such as the studies of fuel-borne sulfur on emissions control systems that led to an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ruling in 2000 that brought about ultra-low sulfur (15 ppm) diesel fuel, and the Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Studies that led EPA to approve use of 15% ethanol in gasoline. A description of more recent high-octane fuels research that may yet impact the U.S. fuel pool will also be provided.

Bio - Brian West is the Deputy Director of the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center at ORNL. Brian received BS and MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Clemson University and Virginia Tech. Brian’s research at ORNL has involved vehicles, fuels, engines, and emissions control technologies. His work with Lean NOx Traps was cited by the EPA in the ultra-low diesel sulfur rule in 2000, and more recently he led portions of the Department of Energy’s Intermediate Ethanol Blends Program, enabling EPA’s approval of the waiver allowing E15 in 2001 and newer vehicles. During this program, his team developed a method for calculating NMOG (Nonmethane Organic Gas) emissions from vehicles burning ethanol blends using conventional laboratory measurements; the method was adopted by EPA as part of the Tier 3 emissions rule. His current research interests include exploring the use of ethanol in high-octane fuels for improved efficiency. Brian is a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and he is active as an SAE author and organizer.

Back to top

 
November 2016
Thursday, November 10, 2016

Saed Mirzadeh
Corporate Fellow, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Production of Alpha-emitting Radionuclides for Cancer Therapy

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Saed Mirzadeh, Corporate Fellow, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Production of Alpha-emitting Radionuclides for Cancer Therapy

Abstract – Within the past five years, the investigation of targeted cancer therapy using a-emitters has developed considerably and recent clinical trials have generated promising results. In specific, the initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the a-emitter 213Bi in killing cancer cells. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both 213Bi, and the 225Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-d 225Ac parent -- a member of the 229Th chain. This presentation summarizes our experience in producing 225Ac (parent of 213Bi) in partial support of the on-going clinical trial. The initial purification of 229Th from waste material began at ORNL in 1995, and since then the separation process has been refined and expanded to a current production level of ~760 mCi of 225Ac in 2013. Initiatives to enhance the production of 225Ac to meet the growing demand will be discussed in some details. These initiatives include both reactor and accelerator production of 229Th, and direct production of 225Ac via high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal targets.

Bio - Dr. Mirzadeh received a B.S. in chemistry from the National University of Iran and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of New Mexico. He began his career at ORNL in 1989 and is currently a distinguished staff scientist in the Nuclear Security and Isotope Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he serves as the technical lead for the medical isotope research and production program.

Dr. Mirzadeh is an internationally recognized leader in the research, production, and application of medical isotopes and a renowned authority in many aspects of targeted alpha therapy (TAT). His work in radiochemistry has been vital to perfecting chemical separations and purification for a variety of source radioisotope generators. Several of his patented radioisotope generators are the foundation for the production and purification of radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine applications. Mirzadeh also has worked and collaborates with a number of medical researchers in establishing protocols for radiolabeling of biological targeting molecules.

Dr. Mirzadeh’s career is distinguished by his efforts in the research and production of 225Ac. Once his research identified 225Ac as an ideal radioisotope for TAT applications, he led the recovery and purification of 229Th for use in the creation of 225Ac. Because of this work, ORNL remains the largest source of highly purified 229Th, and 225Ac is now widely used in clinical trials and research. In addition, Mirzadeh is collaborating on a project with colleagues at Brookhaven and Los Alamos National Laboratories to investigate a different method of producing 225Ac through irradiation of thorium targets using linear proton accelerators. His current research is also focusing on the production 227Ac for medical applications, and the potential use of nanoparticles for the delivery of radium and actinium isotopes for treatment of cancerous cells.

Dr. Mirzadeh holds 13 patents in the areas of radioisotope production for medical applications and is the author of 4 book chapters and more than 160 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Mirzadeh has served on the publication committee of the American Chemical Society’s Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, has been a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Applied Radiation and Isotopes, and has won several awards, including a R&D 100 Award and the 2007 American Nuclear Society Seaborg Medal.

Throughout the course of his career at ORNL, Mirzadeh has mentored more than 70 undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral students. His guidance has helped many of these young scientists develop into leaders within government, industry, and academia.

In 2016, Dr. Mirzadeh was named an ORNL corporate fellow, with following citation, “For his innovation in the production and application of medical isotopes; for advancing the separation and purification of actinides and heavy elements; and for his leadership in the use of alpha emitters to save the lives of cancer patients”.

Back to top

 
December 2016 - Joint Meeting with SWE
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Howard Kerr
Retired Oak Ridge National Laboratory employee and former State Representative
Honeybees & Humans – Understanding the Relationship

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Howard Kerr, Retired Oak Ridge National Laboratory employee and former State Representative - Honeybees & Humans – Understanding the Relationship

Abstract - Honeybees are extremely important to human societies and to ecological systems because of their pollination of numerous plants and subsequent impact on production of food and fiber. Honeybees are social insects that have complex social and physiological characteristics that have remained relatively unchanged for many centuries. During the past century, humans have developed methods to manage colonies of honeybees for specific purposes. Some of these honeybee characteristics will be described and related to modern beekeeping developments.

In recent years, various human activities have caused major stresses on honeybees and have resulted in sharp declines in the populations of honeybees and other insect pollinators. Since we are not likely to significantly change the honeybee’s behavior we must determine what changes in human activities will reduce the stresses on honeybees. Some human activity/resulting stresses/potential remedies will be presented.

A colony of honeybees is a complex biological system, and increasing our knowledge of this system will require use of various physical science technologies. Some past efforts at ORNL relative to honeybees include development of an acoustic device to identify various sub-species of honeybees and a tracking device to study the mating behavior of honeybees. Honeybees were also used for environmental surveillance programs. These efforts will be summarized and other needs described.

Bio - Howard Kerr holds a degree in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Tennessee (UT) and was a senior research engineer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1965 to 2001. During his tenure at ORNL, Howard focused on advanced reactor designs, materials irradiation, criticality safety, dosimetry, special nuclear materials safeguards and security, and research reactor safety. Mr. Kerr was also an elected 20th District State Representative from 1994 to 2000, where he chaired the Nuclear Waste Committee for the National Conference of State Legislatures for 4 years, served as the Citizen Representative of Governor McWherter’s Solid Waste Roundtable, and authored and sponsored the TN Apiary Act of 1995.

Mr. Kerr is currently a board member for the Boys and Girls Club, member of the Kiwanis Club of Maryville, founder of the Blount County Solid Waste Authority and Public Building Authority, Managing Director of Alnwick Community Club, and a Lifetime Member of the TN Beekeepers Association. Mr. Kerr has been a Beekeeper for 50+ years and currently has 100 colonies. He is an officer in local and state associations and frequently teaches classes and gives presentations on beekeeping. Mr. Kerr has led efforts to establish beekeeping positions at UT and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture. He has also conducted bee related research at ORNL on use of bees with acoustic identification devices, tracking devices, and in environmental surveillance programs.

Back to top

 
January 2017
Thursday, January 19, 2017

Nick McClung
Manager of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Risk and Quality Assurance Department
Quality Assurance of TVA's Landfills

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Nick McClung, Manager of the TVA Risk and Quality Assurance Department, Quality Assurance of TVA's Landfills

Abstract - The Kingston Ash Spill experience in 2008 transformed the management of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs) at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Since 2008, TVA has been in the process of reducing the risk associated with CCP ponds and landfills by converting wet storage of CCPs to dry storage, integrating state of the art instrumentation and monitoring tools and developing state of the art Quality Assurance (QA) practices for landfill management of CCPs. In 2012, TVA began the process of evaluating industry practices in landfill management of CCPs and general earthwork of dams. A pilot project began to evaluate the geotechnical characteristics of CCPs and the differences in standard QA processes of CCPs and earthen materials. TVA also began the development of a robust, cost efficient and automated process to monitor entire areas of landfills to insure the total volume was qualified versus the standard practice of spot checking. The pilot study resulted in a coupled design of engineering specifications for compacted CCPs and an automated field verification system using roller compactors known as intelligent compaction. The intelligent compaction system is calibrated with eight standard quality assurance field tests to insure engineering specifications are consistently represented in roller compacted maps. Once calibration is complete, the maps become the evaluation method for operators and engineers to validate the compaction of CCPs. CCPs often change based on coal blends, plant processes and time of placement and therefore the calibration process builds on these changes over time resulting in a database of maps that can be used when these conditions change. The Validated Intelligent Compaction Monitoring system allows TVA to monitor 100% of the volume of the landfills and insure these facilities pose as little risk to the environment as possible. This system is state of the art and practice and should revolutionize the manner in which CCP landfills are monitored throughout the power industry.

Bio - Nick McClung currently manages the Risk and Quality Assurance department for TVA Civil Projects and Coal Combustion Product (CCP) Management in Chattanooga. He previously was a TVA Program Manager for Dam Safety Technical Services and a Geotechnical Engineer at ARCADIS. He is a registered professional engineer and a graduate of The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. He is described as a professional geotechnical engineer that is passionate about dams, levees and coal combustion impoundments and landfills.

Back to top

 
February 2017 - Joint with ANS
Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Jim Roberto
Associate Laboratory Director, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Tennessine (element 117) Discovery

Location: Calhouns on the River, 400 Neyland Drive, Knoxville, TN 37902
Cost: $25
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking (Cash Bar Available)
6:30 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Jim Roberto, Associate Laboratory Director, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Tennessine (element 117) Discovery

Abstract - The periodic table received a significant update in December 2015 with the recognition of four new chemical elements with atomic numbers 113, 115, 117, and 118. Element 117, the most recent of these discoveries, was synthesized by bombarding a 249Bk target produced at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Radiochemical Engineering Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an intense beam of 48Ca ions at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The resulting nuclei included two isotopes of element 117, with nine new heaviest isotopes of odd-Z elements 115 through 105 observed in related decay chains. These nuclei represent our closest approach to date to the “island of stability” for super-heavy elements originally proposed by Seaborg in the 1960s. The results provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of the island, where the effects of closed shells of neutrons and protons are expected to confer exceptionally long lifetimes to super-heavy nuclei. The presentation will review recent progress in super-heavy element research with a focus on the significance of element 117, the role of actinide targets, and opportunities to produce even heavier nuclei and elements. Element 117 officially joined the periodic table in November 2016 as Tennessine (Ts), recognizing contributions of the Tennessee region, including ORNL, Vanderbilt, and the University of Tennessee to super-heavy element research.

Bio - Jim Roberto is Associate Laboratory Director for Science and Technology Partnerships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He oversees ORNL’s strategic engagement with industry and universities, including technology transfer and partnership activities involving hundreds of companies, universities, joint faculty, and graduate students. He previously served as ORNL’s Deputy for Science and Technology, Associate Laboratory Director for Physical Sciences, and Director of the Solid State Division. Jim joined ORNL in 1974 after receiving a Bachelor’s degree in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and PhD in applied physics from Cornell University.

A former president of the Materials Research Society, Jim has authored or coauthored more than 100 publications, co-chaired numerous national and international conferences, and presented more than 200 invited talks and seminars. His research interests include condensed matter and materials physics, ion-surface interactions, materials for energy-related systems, and the synthesis and properties of super-heavy nuclei, where he participated in the recent discovery of element 117. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, fellow of the Materials Research Society, and recipient of the 2004 National Materials Advancement Award from the Federation of Materials Societies.

Back to top

 
March 2017 - Joint Meeting with UT Student Chapter
Thursday, March 21, 2017

TBD
TBD
UT Unit Operations Laboratory Tour

Location: UT Knoxville, Min Kao Engineering Building, Room 622
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee Meeting (Local Section – All members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Local and Student Section Networking
6:30 p.m. Dinner – Min Kao, Room 622
6:30 p.m. Presentation – Kyle Mack, Uranium Processing Facility Project – Casting Process Lead, Bechtel National, Benefits of AIChE as a Professional
6:45 p.m. Presentation – Mary McBride, University of Tennessee, Upcoming Southern Student Regional Conference
7:00 p.m. Program - Dougherty Engineering Building - Unit Operations Laboratory Tour
Abstract - AIChE Member Benefits (Kyle Mack): Becoming a member of AIChE as a professional provides many benefits, some that are recognizable and some that are behind the scenes. From enhancing your network to broadening your knowledge, the local section of AIChE will be presenting some of the benefits that come from your AIChE membership to increase the knowledge of the existing members as well as encourage the future young professionals to continue the strong legacy that a professional society can provide to the profession worldwide. For more extensive benefits for AIChE see AIChE Benefits .

Southern Student Regional Conference information (Mary McBride): On March 31st and April 1st of this year, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville will be hosting the annual regional student conference. During this conference students from all over the southeast, including Puerto Rico, will be networking, competing, learning, and touring facilities around the Knoxville area that showcase varying engineering applications in the real world. With a conference of this magnitude, the student section of AIChE at the University of Tennessee will have their hands full. The conference chairs will be presenting some information about how we, as professionals, can become more involved on that weekend and make the experience as beneficial and enlightening to the students that are attending. 2017 AIChE Southern Regional Conference

Unit Operations Laboratory Information: Housed in the Nathan W. Dougherty Engineering Building on the campus of the University of Tennessee, the lab offers state-of-the-art facilities for engineering students to learn real-world practices. Unit operations labs are often used to help chemical engineering students take theoretical knowledge from the classroom and put it to use under monitored conditions. In particular, students can go through the process of converting raw materials into finished products, something that helps them prepare for employment after college. “Having a lab such as this will allow us to expose our students to the practices and experience that are so critical to success after college,” said Bamin Khomami, head of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering .

For a Fortune 300 company like Tennessee Eastman, being roughly 100 miles away from UT has provided them with one of their most critical resources: people. While funding and mentoring provided by Eastman help UT, having such a highly skilled crop of graduates in their backyard is one of the significant ways that UT returns the favor.

“Having the best engineering school possible benefits the region, not just Eastman,” said Etta Clark, Eastman’s vice president for global public affairs and policy. “Our relationship is about collaboration and teamwork, and developing a solid foundation for students to succeed in the workforce. When those students secure local jobs, it benefits everyone.”

In addition to the lab itself, Eastman also has sponsored a commons area in Dougherty, where students study or relax; three professor-of-practice positions; and the HITES— High School Introduction to Engineering Systems—camp. The company’s contributions total more than $2 million.

Back to top

 
April 2017
Thursday, April 18, 2017

Dr Emory Ford
Emeritus Director of Materials Technology Institute (MTI)
A Peripatetic Life - The Life of an Engineer

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20 (cash or check)
Optional Payment Method: $22.09 (Credit Card) online payment at the Eventbrite.com payment processing site.
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking (Cash Bar Available)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr Emory Ford, Emeritus Director of MTI, A peripatetic Life - The Life of an Engineer

Abstract - Peripatetic means traveling place to place and working in various places for relatively short periods. Dr. Ford will share his experiences of more than 50 years working in engineering and technology. He will discuss how engineering principles that engineering students learn will enable them to have productive, satisfying careers in engineering and other fields as well.

A little sense of direction for my talk.

I am not here tonight to discuss the specific technical skills learned in engineering: the skills of chemical engineering, electrical, mechanical, civil and so forth. But rather some general principles that all engineers learn or at least should learn and be taught.

As a start I will outline my “peripatetic” travels in engineering and then return to principles of engineering that permit and insure a successful life as an engineer and one might suggest, at some risk, general success in life.

Some people have suggested that “success” is getting what you want and wanting what you get. When I left undergraduate school there were two things I had in my mind, getting married to my current wife of 50 years and to be a scientist. Now 50 years later I am still trying to learn science and engineering.

My objectives for my talk are: to share my experience with the next generation of engineers, perhaps teach a little and stay connected with the engineering community across the generations.

Bio - Emory Ford obtained a BS in chemistry from Hartwick College and a PhD in chemistry from Syracuse University. He has done post-graduate work at U. of Mass, Lehigh University and Washington University in St. Louis, MO.

Dr Ford held R/D positions at Monsanto, Northern Petrochemical and Lyondell/Equistar. He retired from Lyondell as director of fundamental research and Chief Scientist. While at Equistar Dr. Ford was an adjunct professor at the U. of Cincinnati. He is now Emeritus Director of Materials Technology Institute and is an MTI Fellow

Industrial experience includes catalyst development, syngas process development, olefin process development, materials selection for new petrochemical processes and process development in acetic acid, methanol and vinyl acetate.

Dr. Ford’s research interests are in materials science, catalyst synthesis/development, high temperature corrosion and nanoscience/nanotechnology.

Dr. Ford is a member of ACS, AIChE, AAAS, Sigma Xi, New York Academy of Science and IUPAC. He is the former Chair of the Industrial Advisory Board to the U. of Cincinnati Materials Science Dept. He was member of the DOE Vision 2020 Steering Team for the Chemical Industry.

Dr. Ford has done work at Oak Ridge National Lab and at Argonne National Lab, coordinating DOE funded projects at both National Laboratories.

Dr Ford is the author of several US and foreign patents, numerous technical articles and presentations, author of encyclopedia articles, and coordinator for the development of several technology roadmaps.

Dr. Ford lives in Massachusetts with his wife. He is a life-long distance runner. Science and technology are his vocation and avocation. He is the proud grandfather of four grandchildren.

 
 
April 2016
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

CBE Honors Awards Banquet

2016 UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Honors Awards Banquet

Location: Southern Depot, 318 West Depot Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37917
Cost: $20
Schedule:
6:00 p.m. Social
6:45 p.m. Welcome - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Banquet
7:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu




Abstract - The annual UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering student awards banquet will be held at the Southern Depot on April 20, 2016. Traditionally, two student teams are chosen from CBE 411 projects class to present their research or design projects.

This is an excellent opportunity to see the types of research young chemical engineers are performing.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.

RSVP to Rita Gray (rgray22@utk.edu) by Thursday, April 15, 2016

Back to top

May 2017
Thursday, May 16, 2017

Jim Brogan
Brogan Financial
Finances

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $10 (Cash or Check – NOTE: There is no cost for the program or PDH Certificate)
Optional Payment Method: $11.54 (Credit Card) online payment at the Eventbrite.com payment processing site.
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Pizza and soft drinks at the Museum
7:00 p.m. Program - Jim Brogan, Brogan Financial, Finances

Abstract -

Bio -

Back to top

For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive.