Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
Calendar of Events
AugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayArchive

August 2006 - Fall Social
Thursday, August 31, 2006

Fall Social
Smokies Baseball Park

Location: Smokies Baseball Park
Cost: $16.50
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Picnic - All you can eat buffet of hamburgers, hot dogs, BBQ, baked beans, cole slaw, chips, cookes, and Pepsi products
7:00 p.m. Game - Knoxville Smokies vs. Mobile Baybears

Direction - From Knoxville take I-40 East to Hwy. 66 (Exit 407). Turn left onto Hwy 66. Stadium is directly on the right.

Plan to join us at the stadium at 5:30 pm for an all you can eat buffet to meet other members, enjoy the game, and to kick off the 2006/2007 year.

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September 2006
Tuesday, September 19, 2006

Brian Davison
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Bioenergy and the Application of Systems Biology

Location: Mandarin House (694-0350) - Near Downtown West, south of Regal Cinema at 8111 Gleason Drive, Knoxville TN
Cost: $13.00
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Brian Davison, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Bioenergy and the Application of Systems Biology

Abstract - A brief overview of current drivers and justifications for expanded research, deployment, and impact of bioenergy will be discussed. The focus will be how the systems biology approach can be utilized to understand and improve bioenergy systems using examples from ORNL.

Bio - Dr. Brian H. Davison is the Chief Scientist for Systems Biology and Biotechnology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He recently served two years as the Director of Life Sciences Division. In his twenty years of bioprocessing research at ORNL he has performed biotechnology research in a variety of areas, including fermentation of renewable resources (ethanol, organic acids, solvents), non-aqueous biocatalysis, systems analysis of microbes, and biofiltration of VOCs. This has resulted in over 90 publications and six patents. He led a multilab team which received an R&D100 Award for “Production of Chemicals from Biologically Derived Succinic Acid,” in 1997. He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and his B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Rochester. He co-chaired the 15th to 26th Symposia on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals and served as editor of Proceedings in Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol., (1994 – 2005). In 2006, he received the CD Scott award in biotechnology and was named a Fellow in the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), 2006. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering at The University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

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October 2006 - Joint Meeting with AWIS, SWE, and WIN
Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Alan Wintenberg
Atmospheric Glow Technologies
Making Dreams Real

Location: Buddy’s Bar-B-Q Conference Center (584-1924) - 5806 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN - Bearden Area
Cost: $17.00
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Pork BBQ, honey pecan chicken, salad, vegetables, and dessert
7:00 p.m. Program - Alan Wintenberg, Atmospheric Glow Technologies - Making Dreams Real

Abstract - Atmospheric Glow Technologies, Inc. (AGT) is a local company that is developing a number of products using atmospheric plasma technology licensed from The University of Tennessee. This talk will give an overview of the process AGT has gone through to get to where it is today. This involves examining many issues that most start-ups face – acquiring funding, hiring personnel, locating facilities, controlling Intellectual Property (IP), developing technology, and others considerations. The presentation will describe our use of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and other government grants to conduct R&D and to initiate product development. It will also describe some of our R&D efforts and describe the two product areas we have selected for initial commercialization efforts.

Bio - Dr. Alan Wintenberg is AGT's Director of Engineering, and is responsible for oversight of all engineering projects performed at AGT as well as direct project management of several product development projects. Prior to joining AGT in 2003, Alan was a Development Engineer in the Engineering Science and Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Alan received his B.S. in Engineering Physics, and his Master's and PhD in Electrical Engineering from The University of Tennessee. AGT is a growth-stage technology company dedicated to delivering products based upon its One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP®) technology. Potential applications include air purification, decontamination, sterilization, plasma aerodynamics, materials processing and biotechnology. ATG was started five years ago by Dr. Kimberly Kelly-Wintenberg, who is the President, Chief Operations Officer and Director of AGT, Inc.

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November 2006 - Joint Meeting with AWMA
Friday, November 17, 2006

Dr. John M. Storey
National Transportation Research Center
The Watt Road Environmental Laboratory Initiative

Location: Sagebrush Steakhouse & Saloon - 390 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, Tennessee
Cost: ~$10.00
Schedule: 11:00 a.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
11:30 a.m. Lunch - From menu
12:00 p.m. Program - Dr. John M. Storey, National Transportation Research Center - The Watt Road Environmental Laboratory Initiative

Abstract - The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Watt Road Environmental Laboratory Initiative (WRELI) is a comprehensive outdoor laboratory devoted to the study of highway emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), and air toxics (MSATs) from passenger vehicles and trucks. The outdoor laboratory sits within one of the busiest truck traffic corridors in the Eastern U. S. and provides an ideal location for monitoring emissions from the mixed on-road fleet under realistic conditions. ORNL and UT researchers examined ambient air quality for a truckstop site, a near-road site, and a background site. In addition, special remote sensing instrumentation is used to identify individual truck emissions of PM and NOx. As a result of the research, EPA uses the Watt Rd. site as an example of a localized “hotspots” (in space and time) for NOx, PM, and air toxics. In his presentation, Dr. Storey will briefly describe the history of WRELI and the partner institutions involved. He will also summarize key findings to date and plans for future research.

Bio - Dr. Storey has been the leader of the emissions characterization activities at ORNL's Fuels Engines and Emissions Research Center (FEERC) since 1994. He has a Ph.D. in Environmental Science and Engineering from the OGI School of Science and Engineering of the Oregon Health Sciences University (1993) and an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Duke University (1986). His specific research interests include unregulated emissions from advanced emission controls, engine particulate-matter chemistry, on-line emissions instrumentation, and catalytic emissions control. He has authored over fifty conference and journal papers and has two patents.

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December 2006 - Joint Meeting with AWMA
Tuesday, December 5, 2006

Dr. William M. Bass
DABFA, Founder of the Forensic Anthropology Center, Professor Emeritus, University of Tennessee
Forensic Science

Location: Italian Market & Grill, 9648 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN
Cost: $20.00
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Select menu items: 3 Cheese Ravioli, Rotisserie Chicken, Salmon Pico, Italian Market Sirloin, Scampi Pennette, Grilled Pork Ripieni, drinks (coffee, tea, water), and dessert
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. William M. Bass, DABFA - Founder of the Forensic Anthropology Center, Professor Emeritus, University of Tennessee - Forensic Science

Abstract - Dr. Bass will show slides of three forensic cases illustrating how positive identifications are made from bone and teeth. In addition, he will show how death scene evidence leads to the determination of the manner of death, and the sex, age, and the race from human skeletal material.

Bio - Dr. Bass is involved in research related to determining the length of time since death. He serves as the Tennessee State Forensic Anthropologist and is active in consultations and lectures across the country. For more information, please consult the University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Center website. Dr. Bass has written two books: Death's Acre and Carved in Bone.

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January 2007
Tuesday, January 16, 2007

Dr. Chuck Melcher
Director of the Scientillation Materials Research Center at UT
Development of New Scintillation Materials for Radiation Detection

Location: Mandarin House (694-0350) - Near Downtown West, south of Regal Cinema at 8111 Gleason Drive, Knoxville TN
Cost: $13.00
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Chuck Melcher, Director of the Scientillation Materials Research Center at UT - Development of New Scintillation Materials for Radiation Detection

Abstract - Scintillators are materials that emit brief pulses of light following the absorption of x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, or other ionizing particles and photons. The discovery and development of new scintillation materials has been mostly driven by the needs of radiation detection in dosimetry, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics experimentation, energy exploration, and homeland security. For many years the search for new materials was somewhat Edisonian in nature, but has more recently become increasingly based on fundamental research of scintillation mechanisms, which is now leading to the discovery of new materials with surprising properties.

Bio - Chuck Melcher is Research Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee, and is the Director of the Scintillation Materials Research Center at UT. Previous positions include Senior Scientist and Program Leader of Advanced Detector Materials at Schlumberger-Doll Research (Ridgefield, CT), and Director of Detector Materials Research at CTI Molecular Imaging (Knoxville, TN). He received a B.A. in physics from Rice University (Houston), and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Washington University (St. Louis). He has over 80 publications, 7 U.S. Patents and 2 U.S. Patents pending. Chuck is the Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, Chair-elect of IEEE NPSS Radiation Instrumentation Technical Committee, and a recipient of the 2006 IEEE NPSS Merit Award.

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February 2007
Thursday, February 15, 2007

Dr. Timothy G. Rials
Professor and Director, Southeastern Sun Grant Center
The Lignocellulosic Biorefinery: Vision and Implementation

Location: Naples, 5500 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN, (865) 584-5033
Cost: $17
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - 3 entrees to choose from: lasagna, manicotti, canonelli, salad, drink, and dessert
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Tim Rials, Professor and Director, Southeastern Sun Grant Center - The Lignocellulosic Biorefinery: Vision and Implementation

Abstract - There is now widespread support to reduce our nation’s dependence on petroleum as a source of energy. Several technology platforms – wind, solar, hydrogen – will undoubtedly play an important role in providing alternative sources of power and energy. Biomass conversion, however, is the only viable approach to provide liquid fuels, chemicals, and materials. According to recent reports, 5 billion gallons of ethanol were produced in 2006, primarily from corn and mainly in the Midwest. While highlighting the economic competitiveness of the technology, it is clear that competing uses of corn for food and grain places constraints on the ultimate impact of this fuel source. Lignocellulosic biomass in the form of wood and perennial grasses represents the resource that is available to more dramatically impact petroleum reliance. Estimates are that a sustainable annual supply of more than 1 billion tons of this feedstock is available; however, advances in the science and technology of processing remain before the economics are attractive. This presentation will describe the biorefinery vision while highlighting some of the challenges that must be overcome for cellulosic ethanol to be competitive. Recent efforts to develop the biofuels industry in Tennessee will also be discussed.

Bio - Professor and Director: B.Sc. in Forestry and Forest Biology from Mississippi State University in 1980; M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Wood Science and Technology (polymer chemistry emphasis) from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1983 and 1986 respectively; Became an Assistant Professor in the Forest Products Laboratory at University of California in 1986; Joined the USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station as a Research Physical Scientist in 1988; Promoted to Project Leader/Research Scientist in 1996; Joined the Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at Tennessee Forest Products Center in 2001. His research interests include structure and properties of wood/polymer interfaces, raw material assessment and process monitoring using spectroscopy, and cure analysis of thermosetting polymers.

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March 2007
Thursday, March 8, 2007

Dr. Larry Campbell
Advanced Catalysts Inc.
How to Start a Small Catalyst Company and Some Examples of Applied Catalysis

Location: Mandarin House (694-0350) - Near Downtown West, south of Regal Cinema at 8111 Gleason Drive, Knoxville TN
Cost: $13
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - TBD
7:00 p.m. Program - Larry Campbell, Advanced Catalysts Inc. - How to Start a Small Catalyst Company and Some Examples of Applied Catalysis

Abstract - The days of lifetime employment with the same corporation have long past and most of us will find ourselves at some stage looking for new employment. Today small companies provide most of the new job growth and most engineers have probably dreamed of starting their own company.

The Advanced Catalyst Systems story will present a case history about how one small company was formed by engineers and scientists and will also discuss some of its interesting technical applications of catalysts for industrial pollution control and energy production. (Part of this presentation is extracted from a presentation at the 1998 National AIChE meeting in Houston.)

Bio - Dr. Larry Campbell is a scientist and inventor (holding 28 US patents) and an entrepreneur, founding two successful start-up catalyst companies. Larry received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Purdue University. He started his career in surface chemistry research at Corning, and then moved to Engelhard, where he held increasingly responsible management positions, finally serving as Group Vice President with worldwide responsibility for Engelhard’s electronic materials business. He left Engelhard to be president of a venture capital backed, technology driven company developing and making materials for advanced composites. In 1988 Dr Campbell co-founded Advanced Catalyst Systems, Inc., in order to serve the needs defined by the Clean Air Act of 1990. He developed and patented catalysts for nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur oxide abatement from combustion exhaust. This technology formed the technical basis of a joint venture company now known as EmeraChem, which was formed to provide the technology to the gas turbine power co-generation markets. Dr Campbell served as co-CEO and as Chief Technical Officer for EmeraChem. In 1998 he resumed his activities with Advanced Catalyst Systems, LLC, which he currently co-owns. For more information about Advanced Catalyst Systems, LLC, see their web site at www.advancedcatalyst.com.

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April 2007
Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Student Awards Banquet

Location: University Center (on UTK campus) - The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996
Cost: $18 Faculty and Members
$5 Students
Schedule: 5:45 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)- Room 217
6:30 p.m. Dinner (Ballroom)
7:15 p.m. Program - UT Student Project(s)

Abstract - UT Department of Chemical Engineering students will provide our program. Several student teams will describe their research or design projects. This is an incredible opportunity to see what types or research young chemical engineers are performing.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.

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May 2007 - Joint Meeting with ANS [American Nuclear Society]
Tuesday, May 22, 2007

Dr. Mike Simonson
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

Location: Sagebrush Steakhouse & Saloon - 390 South Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, Tennessee
Cost: $15
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From the following menu items:
Chicken - Two grilled chicken breast over a bed of rice with choice of one side item.
Beef - 12 oz chop steak with choice of mushrooms or onions served with choice of two side items.
Pork - Hickory smoked pork chopped and piled high served with choice of bunkhouse beans or slaw and French fries.
Fish - Grilled or Fried Catfish served over a bed of rice with choice of one side item.
SIDE ITEMS: Vegetable Medley, Macaroni and Cheese, Bunkhouse beans, Mash potatoes, Collard Green, French fries, Baked potato, Sweet potato, Cole slaw, Rice Pilaf, Side salad, Caesar salad
Desserts: Blackberry cobbler, Banana pudding, and Brownies
Beverages: Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Sierra Mist, Mountain Dew, Wild Cherry Pepsi, Root Beer, Sweet Tea, Un-sweet Tea, Water, and Coffee
7:00 p.m. Program - Mike Simonson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

Abstract - The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences is a new user facility at ORNL for fundamental research and discovery in nanoscience and nanomaterials. Located on the Chestnut Ridge site next to the Spallation Neutron Source, the CNMS is supported by the DOE Division of Scientific User Facilities to provide a broad range of capabilities and expertise to benefit the nanoscience user community, and to establish a forefront intramural and collaborative research program driving advances in nanoscience. With over 70 staff members and scientific associates, the CNMS carries out research in macromolecular and catalytic nanomaterials; nanomaterials theory; functional nanomaterials including metal oxide and carbon-based structures; nanophysics including correlated-electron materials and advanced characterization techniques; nanofabrication and nanobiological systems research; and studies of nanoscale structure and dynamics including a range of diffraction and spectroscopy capabilities. An active and productive user research program is supported through periodic calls for proposals and rapid access capabilities for breaking research opportunities.

Bio - Michael Simonson is the group leader for Nanoscale Structure and Dynamics at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences. He specializes in experimental and modeling studies of solution structure, thermophysics, and chemical equilibria over wide ranges of conditions. His current experimental work focuses on studies of aqueous electrolytes including determination of hydration and speciation structures of simple ionic and polyelectrolyte solutes and fundamental interactions governing membrane separations, and determinations of nanoscale structures under varying environmental conditions. Mike received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1983.

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For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive