Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
Calendar of Events
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September 2007 - Joint Meeting with AWMA
Friday, September 14, 2007

Dr. William C. Anderson (Billy)
TestAmerica (formerly Severn Trent Laboratories)
Origins of Risk

Location: Mandarin House (694-0350) - Near Downtown West, south of Regal Cinema at 8111 Gleason Drive, Knoxville TN
Cost: $10.00
Schedule: 11:00 a.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
11:30 a.m. Dinner - Buffet
12:00 a.m. Program - Dr. William C. Anderson (Billy), TestAmerica (formerly Severn Trent Laboratories) - Origins of Risk

Abstract - Arguably, no legislative criterion has had a larger impact on public policy than the concept of 10-6 as an acceptable risk.  The talk will center around the origin of this relative risk evaluation criterion, perspectives regarding some of the impact that it has had economically and legislatively, and some additional discussion on the perspective of our public opinion.

Bio - Dr. Anderson works for TestAmerica's Knoxville Laboratory, which was formerly known as Severn Trent Laboratories, located on Middlebrook Pike.  He has worked for TestAmerica and its predecessors for 24 years, joining the laboratory when it was owned and operated by IT Corporation. Dr. Anderson is a project manager involved with incineration testing strategy.  In addition to projects for Eli Lilly and Company, Focus Environmental, Inc., and occasionally Idaho National Laboratory, he assists other chemists and project managers with special analysis or incineration testing issues.

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October 2007
Thursday, October 18, 2007

Dr. Karen M. Golden
Senior Program Manager, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)
Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing: A Solution for Increased Energy Demands

Location: Calhoun's Bearden Hill, 6515 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN, (865) 673-3377
Cost: $20
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Select from menu or buffet
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Karen M. Golden, Senior Program Manager, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing: A Solution for Increased Energy Demands

Abstract - With the increased demand for energy, the need for nuclear power is in the forefront of many nations. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) seeks to expand the use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet the growing electrical demand. A closed-loop fuel cycle is essential to a successful program that will maintain a reliable source of fuel and enhance energy security in a safe and environmentally responsible manner, while simultaneously promoting non-proliferation. An overview of the GNEP Program will be presented with a status of current research on fuel reprocessing.

Bio - Dr. Golden works for Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) located in Oak Ridge Tennessee. She has worked at SAIC for 10 years as a human health risk assessor and a senior program manager. She received her doctoral degree in environmental microbiology from the University of Georgia. At SAIC she manages contracts with Bechtel Jacobs and UT Battelle (both DOE prime contractors). She served as the deputy project manager for the Oak Ridge GNEP Siting Study conducted to provide information to DOE on selecting locations for hosting an advanced nuclear fuel recycling center and an advanced recycling reactor.

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November 2007
Thursday, November 15, 2007

Dr. Saed Mirzadeh and Dr. Marc Garland
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Medical Applications of Radioisotopes

Location: Makino Japanese Buffet (560-8878) – 8217 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN – (Across from Room’s To Go)
Cost: $20
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet – Sushi, Habachi Grill, Tempura, Seafood, etc.
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Saed Mirzadeh and Dr. Marc Garland, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Medical Applications of Radioisotopes

Abstract - General applications of radioisotopes in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine will be presented, along with a discussion of how those radioisotopes are produced and the chemistry that is performed to purify and utilize the radioisotopes. These general applications include molecular imaging techniques such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), and targeted therapy strategies such as molecular targeting, natural targeting, and brachytherapy. A particular focus will be on the production of tungsten-188 at HFIR, remote processing chemistry, and development of the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 biomedical generator system. A brief overview of medical applications of rhenium-188 in cancer therapy, treating coronary artery disease, and bone pain palliation will be presented.

Bio - Dr. Saed Mirzadeh is a radiochemist in ORNL’s Nuclear Medicine Program, specializing in the production of radioisotopes and separations chemistry. Dr. Mirzadeh joined the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program in 1989, and in 2006 he was promoted to the Distinguished Staff Scientist level. He received his BS in chemistry from National University of Iran in 1969, and his PhD in Physical Chemistry (Radiochemistry) from University of New Mexico, 1978. After a short post doctoral position in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Medical Radioisotope Program and a two-year research associate position in the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Chemistry Department he joined the BNL Medical Department, where he developed methods of producing medical radioisotopes at the BNL 200 MeV proton LINAC.

Dr. Marc Garland is a nuclear engineer in ORNL’s Process Engineering Research Group, with experience in reactor production of radioisotopes. Dr. Garland received his BS in biology from the University of Washington, an MS in electrical engineering from Washington State University and MS and PhD degrees in nuclear engineering from the University of Maryland. His work experience includes engineering and management positions at the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, primarily at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a liquid sodium-cooled test reactor, and a faculty position in the nuclear engineering program at the University of South Carolina.

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December 2007 -
Thursday, December 13, 2007 (NOTE: Time Change)

Dr. Charles W. Forsberg
Corporate Fellow - Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Combining Nuclear, Renewable, and Fossil Fuel Cycles for Sustainability

Location: Estilita's, West End Avenue, Farragut TN (northern extension of Concord Road - off Kingston Pike)
Cost: $20
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Choice of Taco Salad Fajita (beef or chicken), Shrimp enchiladas, Fajitas (beef or chicken), The Chango Chimi Grande (soft or fried, beef or chicken) for main course; Soapilla for Desert; and Soft Drink
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Charles W. Forsberg, Corporate Fellow - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Combining Nuclear, Renewable, and Fossil Fuel Cycles for Sustainability

Abstract - The energy and chemical industries face two great sustainability challenges: the need to avoid climate change and the need to replace crude oil as the basis of our transport and chemical industries. These challenges can be met by changing and synergistically combining the fossil, biomass, renewable, and nuclear fuel cycles.

Fossil fuel cycles. Fossil fuel cycles must be changed to reduce greenhouse impacts and will require options beyond carbon-dioxide sequestration. In situ thermal cracking of heavy oils, oil shale, and coal may enable the production of high-quality transport fuels while sequestering the byproduct carbon from the production processes without moving it from the original underground deposits. These options require integration of non-greenhouse-gas producing high-temperature heat from nuclear reactors with fossil systems for oil production.

Biomass fuel cycles. The use of biomass for production of liquid fuels and chemicals avoids the release of greenhouse gases. However, biomass resources are insufficient to (1) meet liquid fuel demands and (2) provide the energy required to process biomass into liquid fuels and chemicals. For biomass to ultimately meet our needs for liquid fuels and chemicals, outside sources of heat and hydrogen are required for the production facilities with biomass limited to use as a feedstock to maximize liquid-fuels production per unit biomass.

Renewable electric fuel cycles. Nuclear energy can economically provide base-load but not peak-load electricity. Increased use of renewable electric systems implies variable electricity production (depending upon wind and solar) that does not match electric demand. Today, peak electricity is produced using fossil fuels—an option that may not be viable if there are constraints on greenhouse gas emissions. Nuclear-produced hydrogen combined with underground hydrogen storage may create new methods to meet peak electric power production needs and thus enable the larger-scale use of renewable electricity production technologies.

It is the combined nuclear-fossil-renewable fuel cycles that can meet our energy needs, replace crude oil, and avoid excess greenhouse gas releases.

Bio - Dr. Charles Forsberg is a Corporate Fellow at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society, and recipient of the 2005 Robert E. Wilson Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for outstanding chemical engineering contributions to nuclear energy, including his work in hydrogen production and nuclear-renewable energy futures. He received the American Nuclear Society special award for innovative nuclear reactor design and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Engineer of the Year Award. Dr. Forsberg earned his bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota and his doctorate in Nuclear Engineering from MIT. He has been awarded 10 patents and has published over 200 papers.

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January 2008
January 17, 2008

Gregory M. Wenndt
Dupont-Tate & Lyle
Producing 1,3 propane diol from Corn

Location: Mandarin House (694-0350) – 8111 Gleason Drive, Knoxville TN – Located near Downtown West, south of Regal Cinema
Cost: $15
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet
7:00 p.m. Program - Gregory M. Wenndt, Dupont-Tate & Lyle, Producing 1,3 propane diol from Corn

Abstract - DuPont-Tate & Lyle Bio-Products is a joint venture of DuPont and Tate & Lyle producing 1,3 propane diol from corn. As technology complexity grows, a well connected technical community becomes a necessity. Topics covered in the presentation includes the product we make, the wide range of applications in the marketplace, our process, general comments about the biotechnology and what it means for chemical engineers, and a Q&A period. This will be an interactive presentation with samples.

Bio - Gregory Wenndt is the Vice President of Operations of DuPont and Tate & Lyle Bio-Products. He has a B.S. Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois in 1983 and has worked for Tate and Lyle for 24 years. Tate & Lyle is a global supplier of products made from renewable ingredients. Mr. Wenndt has worked in the sweetener plants, ethanol plant, food, industrial starch plants and research departments. He has held a variety of positions within engineering, quality control, and operations management and In 2001, headed up research efforts to develop a commercial process for 1,3 propane-diol from a biological route.

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February 2008 - Joint with ANS
Tuesday, February 5, 2008

Dr. David Rasmussen
U.S. ITER Team Leader for Heating and Fueling Systems, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Overview of the ITER Burning Plasma Experiment and the US ITER Project

Location: Calhoun’s on the River 400 Neyland Drive Knoxville, TN  37902 Phone: (865) 673-3355
Cost: $15
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Social (cash bar provided)
6:30 p.m. Dinner
Entrée: Calhoun’s Buffet - Hickory Smoked Pulled Pork served with Barbeque Sauce, Grilled Barbeque Chicken, Baked Beans, Cole Slaw, Spinach Maria, Baked Cinnamon Apples, and Buttermilk Biscuits & Corn Muffins  
Dessert: Chocolate chip cookies

7:30 p.m. Program - Dr. David Rasmussen, U.S. ITER Team Leader for Heating and Fueling Systems, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Overview of the ITER Burning Plasma Experiment and the US ITER Project

Abstract - ITER (Latin for “the way”) is a major international research project with the goal of demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. ITER will enable study of a fusion-powered “star on earth,” where the same energy source that drives the sun and other stars is reproduced and controlled for sustained periods in a laboratory burning plasma. The ITER project confronts the grand challenge of creating and understanding a sustained burning plasma with the fusion process itself providing the dominant heat source to sustain the plasma temperature. The fusion power will be up to 10 times greater than the external power delivered to heat the plasma. A comprehensive scientific understanding of the burning plasma state and plasma control tools is needed to confidently extrapolate plasma behavior and related technology beyond ITER to a fusion power plant. The project is being designed and built at Cadarache in southeastern France by the ITER partners: the European Union, India, Japan, the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States.

Bio - David Rasmussen is the U.S. ITER team leader for heating and fueling systems. He has 30 years of plasma science experience in diagnostics and technology for magnetic, inertial confinement, and plasma processing systems. His career began at the NASA Ames Research Center, where he was a member of the Pioneer planetary exploration programs. In 1981, he joined the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, where he developed microwave and plasma diagnostics for the Elmo Bumpy Torus and Advanced Toroidal Facility. He has also conducted plasma heating research at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor, Compact Helical System stellarator, Wendelstein stellarator, DIII-D tokamak, and National Spherical Torus. From 1995 to 1997, he managed the semiconductor Plasma Processing Diagnostic Program at SEMATECH in Austin, Texas. His current research is in technology development for fusion plasma heating and fueling. David received a B.S. degree in physics and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in applied science from the University of California, Davis.

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March 2008
Thursday, March 13, 2008

Scott Curran and Sean Peterson
UT Graduate Students
UT Biodiesel - A Model for Campus Sustainability

Location: Gondolier's, West End Avenue, Farragut TN (northern extension of Concord Road - off Kingston Pike)
Cost: $15
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Scott Curran and Sean Peterson , UT Graduate Students, UT Biodiesel Car

Abstract - The coordinators from the small scale waste cooking oil to biodiesel production plant at the University of Tennessee will talk about the UT Biodiesel project. The talk will be centered around sustainable biodiesel production and the details of the methods used to produce biodiesel, test the fuel, and dispose of the waste.   More information on this project can be found at biofuels.utk.edu  

Bio - Scott Curran and Sean Peterson are both graduate students working under the direction of Dr. Butch Irick at the University of Tennessee, where they both received their bachelors in mechanical engineering.  Scott and Sean took over the biodiesel project in the summer of 2005 and have been working on production and research since. Scott and Sean are also team leaders for the Challenge X program at UT in which students have built a biodiesel powered electric hybrid SUV for the Department of Energy and General Motors sponsored competition.

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April 2008
Monday, April 14, 2008

Student Awards Banquet
UT Under Graduate Student Project Teams
UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Senior Designs and Awards

Location: Hermitage Room, Carolyn P. Brown Memorial University Center, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 1502 West Cumberland Ave., Knoxville, TN, phone (865)-974-3455
Cost: $20 (professional engineers, faculty, and staff members)
$5 (UT students)
Schedule: 5:00 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Program - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Senior Designs and Awards


6:30 p.m. Dinner - Buffet
Abstract - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering students will provide our program. Student teams will describe their research or design projects. This is an excellent opportunity to see what types or research young chemical engineers are performing.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.

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May 2008
May 29, 2008

Robert A. (Bob) Hawsey
Director of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)
Energy Efficiency: The First Fuel in the Race for a Clean and Secure Energy Future

Location: Calhoun’s Bearden Hill – 6515 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN (673-3377)
Cost: $15
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Pork barbeque, fried catfish, or grilled lemon chicken
7:00 p.m. Program - Robert Hawsey - Energy Efficiency: The First Fuel in the Race for a Clean and Secure Energy Future

Abstract - The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Program at ORNL develops sustainable energy technologies to create a cleaner environment, a stronger economy, and a more secure future for our nation. The Program is committed to expanding energy resource options and to improving efficiency in every element of energy production and use.

Bio - Robert A. (Bob) Hawsey is the director of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee. He is responsible for leading, coordinating and implementing ORNL's research and development portfolio of projects conducted for the DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. The diverse R&D portfolio includes FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies; Industrial and Building Technologies; Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies; Solar, Wind and Hydropower; Biomass; Federal Energy Management; and Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs; Distributed Energy; High-Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Power Systems; Transmission Reliability; Power Electronics, Sensors and Controls for High-Voltage Applications; Electric Grid Modeling and Visualization; and Electricity Storage. He holds a B.S.-Ed. degree in Physics-Mathematics from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and an M.S. in Engineering Physics from University of Virginia.

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For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive