Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
Calendar of Events
AugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecemberJanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayArchive

September 2008
Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Dr. Timothy G. Rials
Professor and Director, Southeastern Sun Grant Center
Update on the TN BioFuels Plant

Location: Calhoun's at Turkey Creek, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20.00
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Timothy G. Rials, Professor and Director, Southeastern Sun Grant Center - Update on the TN BioFuels Plant

Abstract - There is now widespread support to reduce our nation’s dependence on petroleum as a source of energy. Several technology platforms – wind, solar, hydrogen – will undoubtedly play an important role in providing alternative sources of power and energy. Biomass conversion, however, is the only viable approach to provide liquid fuels, chemicals, and materials. According to recent reports, 5 billion gallons of ethanol were produced in 2006, primarily from corn and mainly in the Midwest. While highlighting the economic competitiveness of the technology, it is clear that competing uses of corn for food and grain places constraints on the ultimate impact of this fuel source. Lignocellulosic biomass in the form of wood and perennial grasses represents the resource that is available to more dramatically impact petroleum reliance. Estimates are that a sustainable annual supply of more than 1 billion tons of this feedstock is available; however, advances in the science and technology of processing remain before the economics are attractive. This presentation will describe the biorefinery vision while highlighting some of the challenges that must be overcome for cellulosic ethanol to be competitive. An update of efforts to develop the biofuels industry in Tennessee will also be discussed.

Bio - Professor and Director: B.Sc. in Forestry and Forest Biology from Mississippi State University in 1980; M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Wood Science and Technology (polymer chemistry emphasis) from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1983 and 1986 respectively; Became an Assistant Professor in the Forest Products Laboratory at University of California in 1986; Joined the USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station as a Research Physical Scientist in 1988; Promoted to Project Leader/Research Scientist in 1996; Joined the Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at Tennessee Forest Products Center in 2001. His research interests include structure and properties of wood/polymer interfaces, raw material assessment and process monitoring using spectroscopy, and cure analysis of thermosetting polymers.

Back to top

 
October 2008
Thursday, October 16, 2008

Dr. Sandeep Agnihotri
Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Tennessee
Carbon Microstructure Reactivity with Ambient Ozone and Their Characterization for Air Pollution Control

Location: Estilita's, West End Avenue, Farragut TN (northern extension of Concord Road - off Kingston Pike)
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Choice of Taco Salad Fajita (beef or chicken), Shrimp enchiladas, Fajitas (beef or chicken), The Chango Chimi Grande (soft or fried, beef or chicken) for main course; Soapilla for Desert; and Soft Drink
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Sandeep Agnihotri, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Carbon Microstructure Reactivity with Ambient Ozone and Their Characterization for Air Pollution Control

Abstract - Aging of carbon is a well-known phenomenon. Activated carbon materials stored under normal environmental conditions are known to be affected by ambient ozone and moisture. Such investigations are rare for carbon nanotubes, a more structured form of microporous activated carbon. Ozonation of nanocarbons is a common treatment. The ozone concentration used in typical ozonation-treatment ranges from 1 to 10%. The objective of this research was to explore whether ozone would oxidize nanocarbons when it is in low concentrations similar to those found in the atmosphere. Ozone is a strong oxidant; however, it is also an air pollutant. The atmospheric concentrations are greatly diluted ranging from 20 to 200 parts per billion (ppb). We have performed several tests to achieve this objective. Ozone was generated using a commercially sold odor-control device. These devices produce an already diluted concentration of ozone for air-quality compliance via the dielectric-barrier-discharge process: a non-photochemical process. Steady concentrations of ozone at 30, 60, 80, 120, and 200 ppb were generated. The concentration-monitoring was performed by an Ambient Ozone Monitor (sensitivity = 1 ppb). Samples of nanocarbons were exposed to ozone containing air for 1 to 15 days. The surface-oxygen of ozone-exposed samples was tracked by X-ray Photospectroscopy and surface-fracture was monitored by Raman Spectroscopy. For exposure to ozone concentrations of 80 ppb and above, we are able to see a significant increase in surface-oxygen, formation of –C=O and –COO functional groups and a related increase in total surface-fracture. Repeating these experiments with a simulated pattern of typical daily concentration-profile of ozone (not steady) is pending. This work was funded by NSF as a small grant for exploratory research (SGER, # 0836365).

Bio - Dr. Agnihotri joined the faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Tennessee in August 2005. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 2005 and his M.S. degree from New Mexico Tech in 2001. Both degrees are in environmental engineering with a focus on Air Pollution Engineering. He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the (Indian) Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University (BHU), India in 1997. Working as a Production Engineer for the Indian Oil Corporation Limited from 1997-1999 he helped commission and operate the Sulfur Recovery and Amine Regeneration Units of a new refinery. His current research interests are focused on the development and application of air pollution control technologies including activated carbon injection and non-thermal plasma for VOC control. He also specializes in the characterization of nanomaterials for energy storage, and their fate and transport in the environment.

Back to top

 
November 2008
Thursday, November 13, 2008 - Joint meeting with ASEM

Kristen Baksa and Jill Hudson
Farragut High School
Mining Intellectual Gold: Revolutionary, Not Evolutionary, Changes in Education

Location: Rothchilds
Cost: TBD
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Program - Ms. Kristen Baksa and Jill Hudson, Farragut High School, Mining Intellectual Gold: Revolutionary, Not Evolutionary, Changes in Education

Abstract - As the growing need for future scientists and engineers became apparent, Farragut High School staff recognized the need to enhance student interest in science and engineering careers and expose students to real-life science beyond the classroom. FHS, in partnership with the University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Knoxville Zoo, has established a program to provide students research-based field experiences, opportunities to attend professional engineering and science meetings, participate in science and engineering competitions, and attend lectures by recognized scientists and engineers. The benefits to students, teachers, mentors, and the community are many, and student participation in the program has more than doubled during the last three years. This program can serve as a model for other Knox County Schools, but more industry partners will be necessary.

Bio - Ms. Kristen Baksa has been teaching chemistry at Farragut High School for 6 years and administering the Farragut High School Science Academy research program for 3 years. She has a BS in Medical Technology from Michigan State and a Masters of Public Health in Occupational/Environmental Safety and Health from UT. She worked as an industrial hygienist for 17 years prior to getting her teaching license.

Ms. Jill Hudson is the head of the Technology Engineering Education program at Farragut High School. Courses currently offered at Farragut include: Innovations and Inventions, Engineering Processes, Technological Systems, and Problems and Solutions in Technology. The state program framework will be changing next year to include more specific integration of STEM programs as well as college-level dual enrollment/credit courses. Ms. Hudson is currently collaborating with PSTCC on a dual enrollment plan. Ms. Hudson has been a teacher for 25 years, including 13 years in Knox County. She received a B.S. in Industrial Arts Education from UT-Knoxville, and a Masters in Vocational/Technical Education from MTSU. She is currently in the process of renovating and reorganizing shop areas of the FHS Career and Technical building in order to better accommodate an engineering/research lab, and a materials and processes lab.

Back to top

 
December 2008
Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Dr. Costas Tsouris
Senior Research Engineer for the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Process Intensification: A Concept for Efficient Chemical Processing

Location: Calhoun's at Turkey Creek, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet (Special menu available upon request)
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Costas Tsouris, Senior Research Engineer for the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Process Intensification: A Concept for Efficient Chemical Processing

Abstract - Process intensification is an engineering strategy of making dramatic reductions in the size of unit operations in order to reduce capital cost, footprint, inventory, energy needed, and raw materials. It can be achieved by integrating multiple chemical processes into single unit operations, by novel reactors, catalysts, new materials, and processes driven by external fields such as electric fields, magnetic fields, microwaves, high-gravity fields, etc. In this presentation, two novel reactors introduced for intensified processing are discussed. The first reactor deals with conversion of liquid CO2 and water into CO2 hydrate for the purpose of ocean carbon sequestration to address accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. A liquid-liquid-solid jet reactor that has been developed to convert liquid CO2 and seawater into solid hydrate at intermediate ocean depths will be described. This reactor has been tested in the laboratory, using a 72-L high-pressure vessel, and in the ocean. The second reactor is a modified version of the centrifugal contactor that has been used for nuclear separations via liquid-liquid extraction. The modified reactor allows control of the residence time, which is necessary to accommodate reactions with slower kinetics. This reactor has been used for biodiesel production.

Bio - Dr. Costas Tsouris is senior research engineer in the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).  He holds a Diploma of Engineering in chemical engineering from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki-Greece, and Masters and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Syracuse University.  Since 1992, he has been working on separations in the Chemical Technology, Nuclear Science and Technology, and Environmental Sciences Divisions at ORNL.  He currently holds a Joint Faculty appointment with Georgia Institute of Technology.

Back to top

 
January 2009
Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Thomas E. Pearson
Product Engineering Manager, ALSTOM Corp.
Springerville Generating Station Unit 3 Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization System

Location: Calhoun's at Turkey Creek, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet (Special menu available upon request)
7:00 p.m. Program - Thomas E. Pearson, Product Engineering Manager, ALSTOM Corp., Springerville Generating Station Unit 3 Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization System

Abstract - The Springerville Generating Station (SGS) is expanding with the addition of two new generating units rated at 400 MWe each. Alstom was awarded the contract to supply and commission the flue gas treatment systems to control the stack emissions for SO2, particulate matter and Opacity. Dry flue gas desulfurization systems (DFGD) each comprised of 2 x 50% spray dryer absorbers (SDAs), a 16 compartment fabric filter (FF), and a lime slaking reagent preparation system were designed and provided. Unit 3 has been in commercial operation since July of 2006. Unit 4 is currently under construction.

This presentation will summarize the SGS unit 3 regulatory requirements, the design criteria, process design, equipment selection, layout, construction and operating performance. In July of 2006 the SGS SDAs were the largest in the world. Since 2006, Alstom has commissioned 2 x 50% SDAs for an 825 MW unit and has a design for a 900 MW unit under construction.

Bio - Mr. Pearson graduated from the University of Illinois in 1978 with a BS degree in Chemical Engineering. While working at ORNL, IT Corp. and the University of Tennessee (UT), he continued his education in Chemical Engineering and received his Master’s degree in 1984 with a minor in Environmental Engineering. His graduate thesis is a “Mathematical Model for the Removal of Sulfur Dioxide in a Pilot Scale Spray Dryer”.

In 1983, Tom assisted in the development of Alstom’s Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA) technology at the University of Tennessee pilot plant in conjunction with his Master’s Thesis. Over the past 21 years he has been responsible for SDA process development and the design of over 2700 MW of SDAs including the world’s largest SDA vessels. He is currently managing the global application and improvement of Alstom’s SDA, SCR and Mercury Capture technologies.

Back to top

 
February 2009 - Joint with ANS
Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Dr. Robert T. Jubin
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Separations Activities

Location: Buddy’s Bearden Banquet Hall (5806 Kingston Pike, 584-1924)
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Robert T. Jubin, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Separations Activities

Abstract - This presentation will highlight recent accomplishments and future focus areas of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s (AFCI) Separations Campaign. The talk will highlight research and development work being conducted in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Coupled End-to-End (CETE) demonstration and other sites across the DOE complex. The CETE demonstration provides an opportunity to couple all of the processing steps required to recycle used nuclear fuel from the shearing operations through dissolution, solvent extraction, and conversion of the recovered materials back into powder and pellets using actual fuel materials. Highlights from recent work will be shown. Solvent extraction equipment development work currently underway at the Idaho National Laboratory will be described. This presentation will also discuss some of the airborne waste management challenges that must be addressed to meet regulatory requirements and the work being done across the DOE complex in this area.

Bio - Dr. Robert T. Jubin is currently the segment lead for Waste Materials and Processing within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Coupled-End-to-End Demonstration at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.  He is responsible for the recovery, conversion, and packaging of the key radionuclide products streams from the demonstration, and is responsible to provide these feed materials to a number of other DOE facilities to support waste form development activities. 

He has authored a number of reports and papers in the area of solvent extraction and holds two patents for improvements to centrifugal contactors.  Bob received his BS degree in chemical engineering from the University of Akron, an MS in engineering management from the University of Tennessee, and a PhD in chemical engineering from the UT.  Bob retired from the U.S. Air Force Reserve, with the rank of Colonel, in 2007.

Back to top

 
March 2009 - Joint with SWE
Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Mr. Greg Palko
Energy Efficiency Program Manager for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilities Management Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Goes Energy Efficient with Biomass-Fueled Steam Boilers

Location: Calhoun's at Turkey Creek, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buffet (Special menu available upon request)
7:00 p.m. Program - Mr. Greg Palko, Leader of the Energy Management Group in the ORNL Facilities Management Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Goes Energy Efficient with Biomass-Fueled Steam Boilers

Abstract - At 60 years of age, ORNL’s steam plant is getting the equivalent of a heart transplant, trading in the existing gas-fired boiler for a new Cleaver Brook super boiler that runs on wood biomass. The biomass-renewable wood and wood products – will undergo a gasification process to fuel steam production for physical plant operations. The gasification technology heats the chipped wood biomass to high temperatures in the absence of oxygen, preventing it from burning and extracting gases that can then be used as fuel. The biomass can come from bark, mill residue, or clean recycled construction material, all from local sources.

Johnson Controls, Inc. will be installing the new boiler system through an Energy Saving Performance Contract that will reduce the fossil fuel consumption at ORNL by more than 80 percent and cut carbon emissions by 730,000 tons. The $89 million project will enable ORNL to exceed energy efficiency goals for federal facilities set through DOE’s Transformational Energy Action Management initiative.

Bio - Mr. Greg Palko is a Certified Energy Manager, Certified Facilities Manager and Project Management Professional. He has more than 25 years experience with facility operations and management at the Department of Energy's East Tennessee Technology Park and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN. He is currently the Energy Efficiency Program Manager in ORNL's Facilities Management Division. In this position he is implementing process improvements and energy efficiency projects to achieve cost savings and stream line facility operations. Mr. Palko has a B.S. in Engineering Science & Mechanics from Tennessee Technological University and a Master of Science in Industrial Engineering from the University of Tennessee. He is ABD for a Ph.D. in Engineering Management from the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

Back to top

 
April 2009
Thursday, April 9, 2009

Student Awards Banquet
UT Under Graduate Student Project Teams
UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Dinner – Creating the FUTURE

Location: Calhoun's on the River, Knoxville, TN
Cost: $25 (professional engineers, faculty, and staff members)
$5 (UT students)
Schedule:
6:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
7:00 p.m. Dinner (Buffet) – Garden Salad with a variety of salad dressings to choose from Grilled Chicken Teriyaki served over rice, Hickory Smoked Pulled Pork with barbeque sauce, Spinach Maria, Stuffed Baked Potatoes, Marinated Vegetable & Pasta Salad, Double Chocolate Cake, and Italian Cream Cake
8:00 p.m. Program - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Dinner – Creating the FUTURE

Abstract - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering students will provide the program for our April 2009 meeting. Two student teams chosen from CBE 411 projects class will present their research or design projects. The teams this year include:

· Clark, Matthew L.; Clark, Jeffrey K.; Empting, Rebecca L.; Kersey, Molly E.; Renner, Christopher B.; Spain, Michael A, "Microrefining of Waste Glycerol for the Production of a Value-Added Product" – Advised by Charlie Moore, Pete Counce, and Paul Frymier.

· Christina Karni – “Development of a predictive relationship for the activity of H2O (aw) and the ionic activity (a±) of Aqueous HNO3 Solutions” – Advised by William Rains, Pete Counce, Jack Watson, Barry Spencer, and Bill Del Cul.

This is an excellent opportunity to see the types of research young chemical engineers are performing. As in previous years the audience will be given the opportunity to determine the winning presentation. The winners of the competition will be recognized during the banquet.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.

Back to top

 
May 2009
Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Mr. Marty Velas
Smokey Mountain Brewery
Smokey Mountain Breweries Tour

Location: Smokey Mountain Brewery, Turkey Creek Shopping Center, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Mr. Marty Velas, Smokey Mountain Brewery - Smokey Mountain Breweries Tour

Abstract - An overview of the beer making process will be presented and will include the following topics:

1. History of beer brewing - Origins of key ingredients, sanitation and stability advances such as refrigeration.
2. General Process - A dissertation of the brewing process (8 subprocesses) with a nod to material, process times, unit operations.
3. Commercial brewing vs. hobby - Contrast engineering considerations and economies of scale.

Bio - Marty Velas is the director of brewing operations for the Copper Cellar Corporation of Tennessee. As brewmaster he is responsible for producing hand-crafted lagers and ales at the Smoky Mountain Breweries in Knoxville, Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge and Farragut, TN. Awards include gold medals at the Great American Beer festival national and at the World Beer Cup international competitions.

Marty began brewing in 1978 after a trip to Czechoslovakia exposed him to world-class beer. In 1986, working as an aerospace engineer in his native California, he traded for a career in professional brewing when he signed on with the first microbrewery in Southern California, Alpine Brewing Co. In 1989, he was sent by Alpine to Southern Bavaria to complete a journeyman-ship at the Hofbräuhaus Traunstein.

As Alpine’s brewmaster, Marty drew upon years of experience and experimentation. He developed an affinity for recipe formulation and product development and introduced such styles as Bock, Wheat, Red Ale and Marzen to Southern California.

Combining his engineering background with his brewing experience, Marty began consulting in 1991 with several equipment manufacturers to design breweries and implement improvements in the factory while training and fine-tuning in the field.

In 1993, while instructing brewing science courses at UCLA, Marty was tapped to design an intensive, hands-on, brewer-training program. In conjunction with Bohemian Breweries of Redondo Beach, California, he developed the American Craft Brewers’ Academy and directed until 1996.

He has trained over 200 successful brewers in the industry and has held brewmaster positions at Manhattan Beach Brewing Co., Redondo Beach Brewing Co. Huntington Beach Beer Co. Brewski’s in Hermosa Beach, Fredricksburg Brewing Co. in Texas, Echigo Landsbrauerei in Niigata, Japan and Turul Brewing Co. in Szalapa, Hungary.

As a sought after industry consultant and educator he has traveled the world to share his expertise in recipe formulation, product development, training, brewery design and installation. Marty was instrumental in establishing the first craft brewery in Japan in 1994 introducing such brewing styles as: Bock, Stout, Pale Ale, Red Ale and Bavarian Style Weizen Beer.

Professional affiliations include active memberships in the Brewers’ Association, MBAA (Master Brewers’ Association of the Americas) and the ASBC (American Society of Brewing Chemists).

Back to top

For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive