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Heterostructured BaSO4–SiO2 Mesoporous Materials As New Supports For Gold Nanoparticles In Low-temperature CO Oxidation

Scientific Achievements: 
Nanosized BaSO4-based mesoporous hybrid materials have been developed as new efficient inorganic salt-based support systems for ultrastable gold nanoparticles in low-temperature CO oxidation..

Significance and Impact:
The high stability and activity of gold nanoparticles on this hybrid support highlight new opportunities in the development of nanosized metal salt supports for ultra-stable gold catalysts.

 Research Details:
•  Heterostructured BaSO4–SiO2 mesoporous materials containing BaSO4 nanocrystals (5–8 nm) have been prepared by a general in situ growth method using amphiphilic sulfonate (SDBS) as the sulfate source. The support interaction is the key to the stability of the catalysts.

 

z-contrast STEM images
Z-Contrast STEM images of
(a) BaSO4–MCF (KHSO4),
(b) BaSO4–MCF (SDBS, 0.005 mol L1),
(c) Au–BaSO4–MCF (KHSO4), and
(d) Au–BaSO4–MCF (SDBS, 0.005 mol L-1)
(550 C pretreatment for (a) and (b) and
300 C pretreatment for (c) and (d);
black arrows indicate BaSO4 nanocrystalline).

Additional Description:
Heterostructured BaSO4–MCF mesoporous materials containing BaSO4 nanocrystals (5–8 nm), prepared by a general in situ growth method using amphiphilic sulfonate (SDBS) as the sulfate source, have been developed as new nonreducible but ‘‘active’’ Au catalyst supports that are preferable to the typical reducible oxide, TiO2, for low-temperature CO oxidation. The high stability and activity of gold nanoparticles deposited on the BaSO4–MCF support suggest a unique interaction between gold nanoparticles and nanosized BaSO4 supports, which highlights new opportunities in the development of nanosized metal salt supports for ultrastable gold catalysts.

Credit:
This work was published by C. C. Tian,S.-H. Chai, D. R. Mullins, X. Zhu, A. Binder, Y. L. Guo, and S. Dai, Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 3464-3466.  Research sponsored by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

Surface Chemistry and Catalysis R&D Projects

Provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Chemical Sciences Division
Rev:   March 2014