DOE EERE Research Reports

Electrically-Driven Heat Pumps

Geothermal Heat Pumps

Horizontal-Coil Heat Exchangers

Geothermal heat pumps can employ deep well vertical-tube heat exchangers or relatively buried horizontal, or spiral, tubing to extract and reject heat to and from the surrounding soil. These are generally made out of a flexible plastic and buried under several feet of topsoil. Projects were undertaken to design, install, and test horizontal ground coils both in a southern climate (Tennessee) and a northern climate (Long Island). Additional work included theoretical analysis of ground coil design and economic evaluations.


Links to Publications:
  1. Field Performance at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) Test Site
    1. TECH House I Horizontal Coil Ground Coupled Heat Pump: 1982-83 Heating Season Performance
    2. TECH House I Horizontal Coil Ground Coupled Heat Pump: 1983 Cooling Season Performance
    3. Final Report: 1984-85 Annual Performance Testing and Analysis of Two Horizontal Coil Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems
    4. Annual Performance of a Horizontal Coil Ground-Coupled Heat Pump
    5. Seasonal Performance Evaluation of Two Horizontal-Coil Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Systems
  2. Field Performance at a Northern Test Site (Upton, New York)
    1. Ground-Coupled Heat Pump System Experimental Results
    2. Design, Operation, and Performance of a Ground-Coupled Heat Pump System in a Cold Climate
  3. Field Performance Validation of an Advanced Design Earth-Coupled Heat Pump System
  4. Horizontal Ground-Coil Heat Exchanger Theoretical and Experimental Analysis
  5. Technical and Economic Feasibility of Horizontal, Multiple Shallow-Well, and Deep-Well Ground Coupling for Residential Heat Pump Applications

DOE EERE R&D Reports | Electrically-Driven Heat Pumps | Geothermal Heat Pumps | Site Map | Key Word Index
 
ORNL Home | Engineering Science & Technology | Cooling, Heating, and Power
Comments & Contacts | Disclaimer

 
U.S. Department of Energy Logo
 
UT-Battelle LLC Logo
 
ORNL Logo