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  • ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites in batteries
    OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 6, 2015—Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. '
  • New, current, completed Wigner fellows recognized - Michael Naguib, sponsored by Nancy Dudney; Michael Chance, sponsored by Lynn Boatner; and Xunxiang Hu, sponsored by Yutai Katoh, all of the Materials Science & Technology Division. The annual Wigner Fellowship reception was held on March 12 to recognize the new and current Wigner fellows along with Wigner fellows who recently completed their fellowship appointment.

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  • MSTD's stainless steel tech wins NACE International award - ORNL Today 4/6/15 - Researchers from the Materials Science & Technology Division have won the NACE International 2015 Materials Performance, Corrosion Innovation of the Year Award. The team includes Michael Brady, Yakinori Yamamoto, Bruce Pint, Govindarajan Muralidharan and Philip Maziasz.
    Together with Carpenter Technology Corporation, the ORNL group helped develop a stainless steel alloy that provides advanced corrosion-resistance properties in high-temperature industrial environments. Alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels, as they're known, offer this capability without the abandoning the lower cost, weldability and formability of conventional high-temperature stainless steels. The technology received an R&D 100 award in 2009. The team was formally recognized at NACE International's 2015 Conference in Dallas, Texas.

  • April 2, 2015 - The Advanced Photon Source Users Organization is excited to announce that the 2015 APS Arthur H. Compton Award has been awarded to Gene Ice, Bennett Larson, and Cullie Sparks (posthumously). This award recognizes an important scientific or technical accomplishment at, or beneficial to, the APS. The award citation reads, “The 2015 APS Arthur H. Compton Award is given jointly to Gene Ice, Bennett Larson, and Cullie Sparks for seminal developments advancing spatially and temporally resolved synchrotron x-ray capabilities.”
    The selection committee reviewed several excellent nominations this year. The nominating and support statements for the Ice/Larson/Sparks team made clear the importance of their work: “This nomination recognizes breakthroughs that have had transformative impacts on focusing monochromators, on submicron 3D spatial resolution x-ray microscopy, and on high-time-resolution scientific investigations at the Advanced Photon Source and synchrotrons worldwide.
    The award will be presented at the APS Plenary Session, Monday, May 11 at 1:55 pm at the 2015 APS/CNM Users Meeting, followed by a talk. Congratulations once again to this year's winners! More information about the Compton award can be found at https://www1.aps.anl.gov/About/Committees/APS-Users-Organization/Compton-Award

 

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  • Materials - Efficient catalysts - January 13, 2015 - Reduction of pollution from vehicles and power plants relies, in large part, on how effectively catalysts can oxidize nitric oxide (NO). Advancing such catalyst performance requires a better understanding of the noble metals used in catalytic converters.

 

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ORNL's Ludtka receives 1994 Ernest O. Lawrence Award

     
     

Oak Ridge National Laboratory researcher Gerard M. Ludtka has been named a winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award, which honors midcareer scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development. He received this award for significant contributions to materials technology through the development and implementation of superplastic forming of uranium alloys and through the development of a method to predict the effects of quenching on microstructure and residual stresses. These contributions improved designs, reduced costs, increased efficiency, and minimized waste in the production of uranium weapons components.

Gerald M. Ludtka's development and implementation of superplastic forming processes for uranium alloys revolutionized the manufacturing of hemispherical weapons components. Dr Ludtka recognized that uranium alloys had the potential for superplasticity and attendant advantages for weapons fabrication. He characterized the superplastic behavior of uranium alloys, developed simple superplastic forming equipment for prototype parts, overcame a variety of engineering problems, and directed the scale-up and implementation of superplastic forming for the manufacture of weapons components. His process provided substantial improvements; including the use of much simpler forming equipment, the fabrication of parts much closer to their final shapes, significant reductions in the amount of waste materials, and reductions in the costs of manufacturing.

Gerard M. Ludtka was born in Philadelphia in 1950. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from Drexel University and a Ph.D. degree in metallurgy and materials science from Carnegie-Mellon University. He worked in failure analysis of helicopter components and titanium metallurgy at the Boeing-Vertol Company in Philadelphia and for General Motors Research Laboratories in Warren, Michigan. From 1982 to 1991, he worked for DOE's Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Currently, he is with DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Materials Process Modeling Group of Metals and Ceramics Division. Dr. Ludtka has twelve patents (issued or under review), over 30 publications in the open literature, and has received DOE's Weapons Complex Award of Excellence three times, the Y-12 Plant Award of Excellence twice, and the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Award of Excellence three times. (Martin Marietta manages Oak Ridge National Laboatory for DOE.)