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Hotbox Test R-value Database

ACT Metal Skin Panels

 

Introduction

On May 5, 2003, a metal-skinned structural insulated panel (SIP) wall was installed in the hot box tests frame by the construction crew from the Alternative Construction Technologies Inc. (ACT).

Wall Description

The ACT system consisted of approximately 3-in of polyisocyanurate foam encased in a structurally designed metal skin. The initial plan was to perform one steady-state hot box test at the chamber conditions of 50° and 100°F for the climate and metering chambers, respectively. The test wall was sized 10-ft wide x 8.5-ft tall and consisted of 5ea 2-ft x 8.5-ft SIP sections.

Galvanized Steel Skins

The top and bottom metal skins of the panel are 26 gauge steel conforming to ASTM specifications. Galvanized metal is continuously roll formed in a patented continuous process whereby the vertical S-shaped structural stiffeners are released and attached to the top and bottom skins.  A panel with a two foot covering weighs less than lumber at only three pounds per square foot. ACT panels are connected utilizing proprietary interlocking connection system.

The polyurethane insulating core of the panel is Class-1 urethane injected as a liquid between the metal skins after integration with the structural stiffeners. The urethane is modified by a fire-retardant additive before being foamed, baked and adhered into place to create a hermetically sealed composite panel of consistent thickness. Thermal conductivity of foam used in the panel core was tested in the hot-plate apparatus using the using the ASTM C-518 test standard method. It was 0.122 Btu∙in./h∙ft².°F for relatively new foam and 0.135 Btu∙in./h∙ft².°F for foam approximately two years old (using the ASTM C-518 test standard). 

 

No Test Results Are Currently Available

 
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