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Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, September 1990; 2(3)

Editors' Note

HGMIS Requests Articles, Comments

Subscribers Number Over 4500

Call for Articles
To further our goal of providing a forum for the exchange of information relating to the genome project, the editors of Human Genome News invite readers to submit relevant articles for publication. For further information or to discuss proposed topics and format, contact Betty Mansfield at (615) 576-6669, Fax: (615) 574-9888.

Suggestions and Comments
We welcome suggestions and comments about format, types and style of articles, and topics covered in the newsletter.

Correction
Some copies of the July issue contained a sequencing gel photograph that was the victim of imprecise cropping, causing a frame shift that could result in an alteration of gene expression. We apologize for the mutation.

Growth in Readership
The number of subscribers, national and international, has grown from about 800 in April 1989 to over 4500 in August 1990, with more than 1/3 of that number requesting other documents as well. HGMIS welcomes this indication of interest in the Human Genome Project.

Mailing List Database
Subscribers can remove their names or add others by filling out the form on the last page of the newsletter.


HGMIS Staff

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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v2n3).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.