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Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, July 1991; 3(2)

Oak Ridge Exon Recognition System Online


Investigators in the Biology and Engineering Physics and Mathematics divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are constructing an intelligent computational system to recognize and interpret genes and other biologically significant features in human DNA sequence data. The first component of this gene recognition system is now accessible through Internet.

Gene Recognition and Analysis Internet Link (GRAIL), a simple user interface, allows users to e-mail DNA sequence files directly to the system and have an analysis automatically returned by e-mail. The current analysis includes potential protein-coding exon positions, with strand assignment and preferred reading frame, and statistical quality evaluation of each potential exon. Analysis turnaround time is generally only a few minutes for sequences less than 100 kb, and either single or multiple sequences may be submitted in each e-mail message.

Further rule-based interpretation of potential exons is planned soon, as are splice-junction analysis and automated database comparison of potential exons using the dynamic programming algorithm. Development of an expert system to facilitate automated computational assembly of recognized gene components and informatics-based interpretation is well under way and will be included in the system later. For system access, users should send an e-mail message to: grail@ornl.gov with the key word "register" in the first line as follows:

  • register, user name, user mailing address, and user telephone number.

The system will assign a user ID number and supply a help file with further instructions on supplying sequence data and interpreting system results. Send questions to:

  • Ed Uberbacher - uber@msr.epm.ornl.gov
  • Richard Mural - m9l@stc.ornl.gov

HGMIS Staff

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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v3n2).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.