Human Genome News, November 1991; 3(4)

Human Genome Project Information. Click to return to home page.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program

Human Genome News Archive Edition

Accessing GDB and OMIM on the Welch Medical Library Computer

SprintNet Access

Hardware Options

  • IBM-compatible PC (at least 512 K of RAM if using WelComm).
  • Apple Macintosh (512, XL, 512e, Plus, SE, or II).
  • Terminal (at least a VT100; to use GDB function keys, VT220 is required).

Communications Software Options

  • WelComm for PC or Macintosh.
  • Commercially available communications software.

Modem

  • Hayes-compatible if using WelComm software.
  • Local SprintNet phone number corresponding to modem speed is available from SprintNet customer service (800/336-0437).

The SprintNet address of the Welch Library computer is 30155030.


Internet Access

Hardware and Communications Options

  • Terminal, PC, Macintosh computer, or Sun workstation with terminal emulation capabilities of VT100, VT220, or VT320 series.

Internet Connection Options

  • Direct connection to Internet.
  • Connection through host machine to Internet.

Telnet Software Options

  • Direct connection through the public-domain software package: NCSA Telnet for PC or Macintosh.
  • Connection through host machine using other Telnet version.

The Internet address of the Welch Library computer is welch.jhu.edu or 128.220.59.10.


GDB Staff

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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v3n4).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.