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Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, January 1993; 4(5)

Los Alamos Develops and Distributes Map Assembly Software

SIGMA (System for Integrated Genome Map Assembly), a new software tool for building integrated genome maps, is being distributed by the Human Genome Information Resource of the Theoretical Biology Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). SIGMA is an object-oriented, graphical map editor based on X windows and an object-oriented database management system (ObjectStore from Object Design, Inc.) with the OpenLook interface standard.

Some major features of SIGMA, designed by Michael Cinkosky and Jim Fickett (both at LANL):

  • Graphical map editing through mouse-based, point-and-click operations.
  • Integrated genome maps incorporating data on any type of map object, with measurements specified in any units. This allows data from many different types of maps to be combined into a single map.
  • User-configurable views on a single map, each of which might emphasize a different aspect of the data.
  • Automatic map evaluation providing constant feedback to the user on how well the drawing and data agree and identifying problems.
  • Support for collaborative map building allowing researchers at different locations to work on the same map.
  • GDB Interface importing maps from GDB for viewing. This feature will soon be able to produce GDB submissions in electronic form.

SIGMA is available from LANL without charge, although an ObjectStore license is required to maintain a local database. For more information on SIGMA, contact Cinkosky (505/665-0840, Internet: sigma@t10.lanl.gov).


HGMIS Staff

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Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v4n5).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.