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Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, July 1993; 5(2)

NCHGR Supports Pre- and Postdoctoral Training


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NCHGR reminds the scientific community that funds are available to support research training at three career levels: (1) predoctoral training through institutional training grants, (2) individual postdoctoral fellowships for advanced training in genomic analysis, and (3) senior fellowships for established scientists who wish to acquire new skills relevant to genomic research. Training is also encouraged in areas related to the NCHGR Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) program. Participation is limited to U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

Receipt dates for institutional training grant applications remain September, 10, January 10, and May 10. New receipt dates for individual fellowship applications are August 5, December 5, and April 5. Specific information on each program may be obtained from the following people.

  • Individual postdoctoral fellowships, Elise Feingold (301/496-7531, BITNET: fey@nihcu, Internet: fey@cu.nih.gov).
  • Institutional training grants, Bettie Graham (301/496-7531, BITNET: b2g@nihcu, Internet: b2g@cu.nih.gov).
  • ELSI program, Eric Juengst (301/402-0911, BITNET: ejs@nihcu, Internet: ejs@cu.nih.gov).

HGMIS Staff

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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v5n2).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.