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Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program

Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, May 1994; 6(1)

NIGMS Repository Resources

The NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Human Genetic Mutant Cell Repository is distributing the following resources:

Regional Mapping Panels

(cell cultures or DNA) Panels consisting of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids with deletion or derivative human chromosomes are available now for chromosomes 11, 15, 17, and 18 and will be obtainable soon for other human chromosomes. Panels have been characterized by (1) G-banded chromosome analysis, (2) in situ hybridization using biotinylated total human DNA, and (3) Southern blot hybridization.

Online Catalog

This first-generation catalog contains all the textual material in the printed catalog as well as additional information for each listing. Cultures are cross-referenced to allow users to search by disease category for all fibroblast and lymphoblast cell lines and related DNA samples in the repository's collection.

[Information or catalog: NIGMS Human Genetic Mutant Cell Repository; Coriell Cell Repositories; Coriell Institute for Medical Research; 401 Haddon Ave.; Camden, NJ 08103 (800/752-3805 or 609/757-4848, Fax: -9737). Catalog access via Internet: telnet to coriell.umdnj.edu (at login prompt, type online). Access via modem: 609/757-9728 (long distance telephone charges apply, but no additional charge for connect time).]


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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v6n1).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.