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Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, Jan.-Feb. 1995; 6(5): 11

Saccharomyces Database Available

The first public release from the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SacchDB) at Stanford University Genome Center is now available using ACEDB software for Macintosh and a variety of UNIX systems. Version 2.3 of SacchDB includes all Saccharomyces genes contained in the Registry of Gene Names on January 21; results of completed sequencing projects for chromosomes I, II, III, V, VIII, IX, and XI; physical maps; remapped Olson prime clones for the completed chromosomes; all Saccharomyces DNA sequences in GenBank release 86; literature references, most including abstracts; gene-protein product information from the yeast protein database; and genetic maps with underlying two-point tetrad data.

SacchDB is accessible via Internet (http://genome-www.stanford.edu) or Gopher to genome-gopher.stanford.edu (port 70). The complete ACEDB database for Macintosh or UNIX can be obtained via anonymous ftp from genome-ftp.stanford.edu (pub/yeast/SacchDB) or ncbi.nlm.nih.gov (repository/SacchDB). The file readme.installation should be retrieved first to determine files needed for a particular system. Suggestions or corrections (yeast-curator@genome.stanford.edu). [Contact: Mike Cherry (415/725-8956, Fax: /723-7016, cherry@genome.Stanford.edu).]


HGMIS staff

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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v6n5).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.