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Human Genome News Archive Edition

Human Genome News, January 1998; 9:(1-2)

SBIR 1997 Human Genome Awards Announced

In July 1997 the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research announced three Phase I and two Phase II awards in human genome topics of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (see box below). The highly competitive SBIR awards are designed to stimulate commercialization of federally funded research and development for the benefit of both private and public sectors. SBIR emphasizes cutting-edge, high-risk research with potential for high payoff in hundreds of areas, including human genome research. (Contact Information.)

SBIR Awards in Genome, Structural Biology, Related Technologies

  • Phase I
    • Cimarron Software, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah): (1) An Integrated Genetic Analysis; (2) A Workflow-Based LIMS for High-Throughput Sequencing, Genotyping, and Genetic Diagnostic Environments
    • Premier American Technologies Corp. (State College, Pennsylvania): A Fully Automated 96-Capillary Array DNA Sequencer
  • Phase II
    • Genaissance Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (New Haven, Connecticut): Peptide Nucleic Acid Modular Probe Technology for DNA Sequencing and Genetic-Variation Discovery
    • Promega Corporation (Madison, Wisconsin): An Engineered RNA/DNA Polymerase to Increase Speed and Economy of DNA Sequencing


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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v9n1).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.