Beyond the Identification of Transcribed Sequences:
Functional, Evolutionary and Expression Analysis
12th International Workshop
October 25-28, 2002
Washington, DC


List of Abstracts * Speakers * Organizers * Authors * Original Announcement


Protein Microarray Technology

Thomas Joos
Biochemistry Department, NMI - Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Tübingen, Reutlingen, 72770 GERMANY
Telephone: +49 7121 51530 844
Email: Joos@nmi.de

Biochip technology allows the simultaneous analysis of thousands of molecular parameters within a single experiment. Most of the current applications focus on DNA array technology for gene expression analysis or on the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms. However, any kind of ligand binding assay that uses an immobilised capture molecule for the detection of the binding of analyte from a solution can be miniaturised. Within the last few years, methods based on microarray technology have been adapted to the analysis of proteins and novel applications emerged. Protein microarrays offer the fascinating possibility to study protein interactions in a massively parallel fashion, including protein-protein, enzyme-substrate, protein-DNA or protein-drug interactions. Theoretical advantages and limitations of a miniaturized ligand assay system will be discussed.To illustrate the opportunities created by this technology examples of assay systems developed at the NMI will be presented.

1. Joos, T.O. et al. 2000. A microarray enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for autoimmune diagnostics. Electrophoresis 21:2641-2650.

2. Joos, T.O., D. Stoll and M.F. Templin. 2002. Miniaturised multiplexed immunoassays. Curr Opin Chem Biol 6:76-80.

3. Templin, M.F. et al. 2002. Protein microarray technology. Trends Biotechnol 20:160-166.


Dr. Thomas Joos
Head, Biochemistry Department, NMI - Natural and Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Tübingen, Markwiesenstr. 55, 72770 Reutlingen Germany
Joos@nmi.d
Phone +49 7121 51530 844

Thomas Joos is Head of the Department of Biochemistry at the Natural and Medical Sciences Institute (NMI) at the University of Tübingen. The NMI is a research foundation (non-profit organisation) founded in 1985. The principal goal of the NMI is to perform applied research for for industrial clients by transferring results from basic sciences into new technology and product development. In a multidisciplinary approach, scientists from the fields of applied and theoretical physics, chemistry, physical chemistry, biology and biochemistry are working together to archive efficient and innovative solutions at the interface between life sciences and material sciences. Dr. Joos has been with the NMI since 1998, where he is responsible for DNA, protein and cell biochip technology.

Prior to joining the NMI, Dr. Joos did his postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Prof. Peter Hausen at the Max-Planck-Institute of Developmental Biology, Department of Cell biology, studying cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction during early embryogenesis of Xenopus laevis. Dr. Joos studied biochemistry at the University of Tuebingen. He received his Ph.D. degree in 1995 on integrin-a5 during early embroygenesis of Xenopus laevis.



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