TRANSCRIPTOME 2002: From Functional Genomics to Systems Biology
March 10-13, 2002
Seattle, Washington, USA

The German cDNA Network cDNAs for Functional Genomics and Proteomics

Slides: PDF file

Stefan Wiemann1, Jeremy Simpson2, Ruth Wellenreuther1, Petra Heidrich1, Regina Albert1, Ingo Schupp1, Vladimir Kuryshev1, Detlev Bannasch1, Rainer Pepperkok2, Annemarie Poustka1, and the German cDNA Consortium, 1Molecular Genome Analysis,German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, GERMANY, 2Cell Biology Program, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, GERMANY

We have formed a network within the German Genome Project aiming at the generation and sequencing of novel full-length cDNAs, and the comprehensive functional analysis the encoded proteins. Over 5,000 cDNAs (> 13.7 Mb) have been sequenced since. This set and greater 83.000 EST-sequenced clones is used to generate a minimal set of full-length cDNAs for employment in subsequent functional analysis. In order to study complex biological systems like the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis or protein secretion, a multitude of complementary approaches need to be followed that combine genomics and proteomics strategies, but also cell biology and computational biology. The availability of full-length cDNAs is elementary for most of these. Only the integration of data from many sources will help to eventually understand protein function and interaction in protein networks and complex biological systems.

ADDENDUM (May 2, 2002):

We have formed a network within the German Genome Project aiming at the generation and sequencing of novel full-length cDNAs, and the comprehensive functional analysis the encoded proteins. Over 5,100 cDNAs (> 14 Mb) have been sequenced since. This set and greater 83.000 EST-sequenced clones is used to generate a minimal set of full-length cDNAs for employment in subsequent functional analysis. In order to study complex biological systems like the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis or protein secretion, a multitude of complementary approaches need to be followed that combine genomics and proteomics strategies, but also cell biology and computational biology. The availability of full-length cDNAs is elementary for most of these. Only the integration of data from many sources will help to eventually understand protein function and interaction in protein networks and complex biological systems.

References:

  1. Simpson, J. C., Wellenreuther, R., Poustka, A., Pepperkok, R. and Wiemann, S. (2000). Systematic subcellular localization of novel proteins identified by large scale cDNA sequencing. EMBO Rep 1, 287-292.
  2. Wiemann, S., Weil, B., Wellenreuther, R., Gassenhuber, J., Glassl, S., Ansorge, W., Bocher, M., Blocker, H., Bauersachs, S., Blum, H., Lauber, J., Dusterhoft, A., Beyer, A., Kohrer, K., Strack, N., Mewes, H. W., Ottenwalder, B., Obermaier, B., Tampe, J., Heubner, D., Wambutt, R., Korn, B., Klein, M. and Poustka, A. (2001). Toward a Catalog of Human Genes and Proteins: Sequencing and Analysis of 500 Novel Complete Protein Coding Human cDNAs. Genome Res 11, 422-435.
  3. Pepperkok, R., Simpson, J. and Wiemann, S. (2001). Being in the right location at the right time. Genome Biol 2, REVIEWS 1024.
  4. Simpson, J. C., Neubrand, V. E., Wiemann, S. and Pepperkok, R. (2001). Illuminating the human genome. Histochemistry and Cell Biology 115, 23-29.

Links:

  1. www.dkfz.de/en/mga/ related to Wiemann et al., Genome Res. 2001
  2. www.dkfz.de/LIFEdb related to Simpson et al., EMBO Rep. 2000

 


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