Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
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September 2014
Thursday, September 18, 2014

Mark McKinney
Project Engineer, First Utility District of Knox County
An Introduction to Knox Pro Corps and It’s Work in the Ulpan Valley of Guatemala

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Mark McKinney, Project Engineer, First Utility District of Knox County - An Introduction to Knox Pro Corps and It’s Work in the Ulpan Valley of Guatemala
Abstract - Knox Pro Corps (KPC) began in 2011 with a group of engineers and other technical professionals desiring to use their skill sets to help people in places where professional services are not readily available or affordable. KPC began working CAFNIMA in the Ulpan Valley of Guatemala to help design and construct water distribution systems. Since 2011, KPC’s volunteers have worked in Guatemala, Haiti, Mozambique, Knoxville and several areas in Appalachia. This presentation will give a brief introduction to KPC, describe the types of projects in which it has been involved, and discuss some of the technical and social challenges of developing new infrastructure in a place like the Ulpan Valley of Guatemala.

Bio - Mark McKinney, P.E. is a Project Engineer with First Utility District in Knox County. He received a BS in Civil Engineering and a MS in Environmental Engineering from the University of Tennessee. He enjoys spending time with his wife and four children all of whom joined him for a year in Guatemala as he designed water systems in the Ulpan Valley.

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October 2014
Thursday, October 23, 2014

Jim Szybist
Senior Research Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Opportunities for Improved Efficiency in Spark Ignited Engines

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Jim Szybist, Senior Research Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Opportunities for Improved Efficiency in Spark Ignited Engines



Abstract - While spark-ignited (SI) engines have been in existence for well over 100 years, there remain numerous opportunities for efficiency improvements due to an improved understanding of the thermodynamics and improvements in engine control technologies. This presentation identifies a number of the practical barriers that limit the thermodynamic efficiency of SI engines, and presents an overview of the research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Fuels Engines and Emissions Research Center (FEERC) that aims to overcome these barriers. The first topic that will be addressed focuses on the enabling impact of fuel properties and chemistry. Next is the ability of a highly dilute SI combustion strategy to improve thermodynamic efficiency. Finally, the role that various fuel reforming strategies can have on extending the dilute combustion limits is discussed. The potential benefits as well as the remaining barriers are discussed for each of these approaches. Finally, the relationship between engine efficiency and vehicle fuel economy is discussed, with a particular emphasis on how the powertrain configuration choices can sometimes be the overwhelming factor.

Jim Szybist

Bio - Jim Szybist is a Senior Research Engineer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center. He received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering in 2000 and a Ph.D. in Fuel Science in 2005 from Penn State University. He joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a staff member in 2007 and has been active in researching fuel effects on engine efficiency and emissions for both gasoline and diesel engine platforms.

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November 2014
Thursday, November 20, 2014

Dr. Robert Hatcher
UT Distinguished Scientist & Professor of Tectonics and Structural Geology, University of Tennessee Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Science Alliance Center of Excellence
Progress in Understanding Seismic Hazard in the East Tennessee Seismic Zone

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Robert Hatcher, UT Distinguished Scientist & Professor of Tectonics and Structural Geology, University of Tennessee Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and Science Alliance Center of Excellence - Progress in Understanding Seismic Hazard in the East Tennessee Seismic Zone

Abstract – The East Tennessee seismic zone has had little detailed investigation of its pre-European settlement history despite being the second most active seismic zone in the eastern U.S. Current seismic activity extends from northeast Alabama and northwestern Georgia through Tennessee and possibly into southeastern Kentucky. Our Nuclear Regulatory Commission-Supported work since 2008 has proved that large seismic events have occurred throughout the seismic zone at least during the last 15,000 years. We have discovered paleoseismic features in young river sediments, including faults with displacements up to 2 m (some involving bedrock), zones of intense fracturing, and paleoliquefaction features, e.g., sand dikes. Faults have been observed in the East Tennessee seismic zone over a distance of 90 km from near Vonore, Tennessee, ~60 km south of Knoxville to Dandridge, Tennessee, ~40 km east of Knoxville. These faults may be isolated features or may be connected as a larger fault system.

The collective data that currently exist indicate there have been prehistoric earthquakes of at least a magnitude of 6.5. Based on these data, we recommend revision of zoning ordinances for the East Tennessee seismic zone region to standards consistent with our new data.

Bio - Dr. Robert Hatcher received a B. A. in 1961 and M. S. in 1962 from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee before receiving his Ph.D. in 1965 from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee.

Professional Employment: Geologist, Humble Oil and Refining Company (1965–66), Clemson University (1966-78, Assistant Professor to Full Professor), Florida State University (1978-80, Full Professor), University of South Carolina (1980-86, Full Professor), and University of Tennessee-Knoxville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distinguished Scientist (1986–2000), UT Distinguished Scientist and Professor (2000-present).

Research Interests: Primary research goal is to gain a better understanding of the evolution of continental crust, mostly through the study of mountain chains and mature crust. Most of my research has been concentrated in the southern and central Appalachians, but large amounts of time have been spent visiting and studying other mountain chains, and Precambrian continental crust. My primary interest is in the mechanics and kinematics of large faults, which formed a natural transition into a related long-term interests in the geologic controls of petroleum occurrence in the Appalachians, radioactive waste management, the causes of intraplate seismicity and geologic evidence for determination of recurrence intervals for intraplate earthquakes. While I am a structural geologist, most of my research is interdisciplinary, integrating stratigraphic, geochronologic, geochemical, and geophysical data into structural studies. I am primarily a field geologist, however, and field data form the basis for all other supporting studies. I have been involved for many years with geophysicists and geologists in other academic institutions and the USGS in the geologic interpretation of seismic reflection and potential field (aeromagnetic and gravity) data. From 1981 through 1983 (part of the Bechtel team), I participated in the Electric Power Research Institute-sponsored study of eastern seismicity, and during the late 1970s and early 1980s participated in the TVA-sponsored Southern Appalachian Tectonic Study (with S. S. Alexander and W. J. Hinze, 1979-1980). Current research support includes a Nuclear Regulatory Commission grant for study of the East Tennessee seismic zone (through 2015), a USGS EDMAP grant (detailed geologic mapping of stream terraces around Douglas Lake), and a National Park Service grant (detailed geologic mapping, Obed W & SR region).

Research Support: Received over $5M in grants and contracts from the National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of the Interior, state geological surveys, and private industry.

Professional Service (Abbreviated): Editor (with W. A. Thomas) Geological Society of America Bulletin (1982-88); President, Geological Society of America (1993); President, American Geological Institute (1996); Trustee, GSA Foundation (1999–2007), Chair of the GSA Foundation Board (2005–07); National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Board on Radioactive Waste Management (1990-96); Federal Advisory Committee on Nuclear Reactor Safety Research (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1993-96); Federal Advisory Committee for the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (Department of the Interior, 1996-2006); Federal Advisory Committee Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (2009-2015; have also served on numerous committees of GSA, AAPG, AGU, and other organizations. Fellow: AAAS, Geological Society of America, Geological Association of Canada.

Professional Registrations: Georgia (#290), Tennessee (#1211).

Medals and Awards: Geological Society of America Distinguished Service Award (1988, the first ever awarded), I. C. White Award (1997), honorary citizen of West Virginia (by the Governor, 1998), John T. Galey Award by the Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (2001), American Geological Institute Ian Campbell Medal (2006), Geological Society of America Penrose Medal (2006), and American Geological Institute Marcus Milling Legendary Geoscientist Medal (2014). The latter three medals constitute the highest levels of career recognition possible in my profession.

Publications: Author or co-author of >200 scientific publications, including 9 books.

Graduate Students: 47 M. S. theses and 17 Ph. D. dissertations completed since began working in graduate departments in 1978. 3 M. S. and 1 Ph. D. student are currently in progress.

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December 2014
Thursday, December 18, 2014

David Moon
Moon Capital Investments
A quick look at interest rates - 5000 BC to present

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - David Moon, Moon Capital Investments - A quick look at interest rates - 5000 BC to present

Abstract - If you are over the age of 50, you probably remember the 1980s when CD and mortgage rates were in the mid-to-high teens. If so, today’s interest rates seem unsustainably low, especially in historical context. That is, if your sense of history correlates anywhere close to your personal experience.

But what if we look at interest rates over an even longer period—say 7,000 years or so? How do today’s rates compare in that context? David Moon will discuss historic interest rate trends, including changes in lending and collateralization practices over the past seven millennia.

Bio - David Moon is President of Moon Capital Management. His editorial writing has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Barron’s and Corporate Board Member magazine. He currently pens a weekly commentary for newspaper publisher Scripps. Prior to Maria Bartiromo’s departure from CNBC, David was a regular guest on her “After the Bell” segment.

David is also the author of Thoughts Are Things®, a collection of daily devotionals for elementary and middle school-aged students and their families. The book received the top award for best Juvenile Inspiration book of 2013 by the Beverly Hill-based National Indie Excellence Awards.

David earned bachelor’s and MBA degrees (both cum laude) from the University of Tennessee, where he was named a member of the Academic All-Southeastern Conference football team his senior year. He was an adjunct professor in the finance department of his alma mater from 1995 to 2002 and earned the Chartered Financial Analyst designation in 1995.

Along with his wife of 29 years and their 14-year-old twins, David lives on an east Knox County farm where his life regularly resembles old episodes of "Green Acres."

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January 2015 - Joint Meeting with ASM
Thrusday, January 15, 2015

Dr. Soren Sorenson
University of Tennessee
What is everything made of? The quest for the ultimate building blocks of the physical universe

Location: Sunsphere Icon Restaurant and Lounge, 810 W Clinch Ave: 6th Floor, Knoxville TN 37902
Cost: $25
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Soren Sorenson, Professor and Head of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, What is everything made of? The quest for the ultimate building blocks of the physical universe

Abstract - One of the most fundamental questions in science is: what is everything made of? In this talk we will discuss how various fields of science work with a given set of "fundamental" building blocks, which in turn have an internal structure, which in turn have an internal structure, which ... . We will discuss issues, like atoms, nucleons, elementary particles, quarks, and maybe even superstrings.

Bio - Soren Sorensen was born in Denmark and grew up in the suburbs of Copenhagen. He attended the University of Copenhagen and majored in Math and Physics. In 1977 he received a Masters Degree from The Niels Bohr Institute and in 1981 received a PhD from the same place. From 1981 to 1984 he was a post-doc at The Niels Bohr Institute, and spent a year from 1982-83 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In December 1984 he began his appointment at The University of Tennessee as an assistant professor in nuclear physics and served as the Head of the UT Department of Physics until 2012.

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February 2015 - Joint Meeting with ANS
Tuesday, February 19, 2015

Dr. Robert (Bob) M. Wham
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Pu-238 Supply Project

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Robert (Bob) M. Wham, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Pu-238 Supply Project

Abstract - The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) relies on radioisotope power supplies (RPSs) to provide heat and electricity for deep space missions, such as the Viking spacecraft as well as the Mars Rover. The current supply of 238Pu is nearly exhausted. Developing a new supply chain is underway using existing reactors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and using existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities are taking place to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design qualification, target fabrication and irradiation of prototypical targets have been accomplished. Chemical processing development tasks have begun on selected separations.

Bio - Robert Wham is a Ph.D. Chemical Engineer whose research focus is radioisotope production and radiochemical separations including recycle of used nuclear fuel. He currently serves as Technology Integration Manager for the Pu-238 Supply Project.

Previously, he served as Technology Integration manager for the Nuclear Science and Technology Division (NSTD) and was responsible for six groups within NSTD. The groups covered diverse areas such as radiochemical processing, robotics, stable isotope production, radioisotope production, and design of remotely operated equipment.

Prior to that, he managed several radiochemical processing programs at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). His experience in hot cells and radioisotope production comes from working on the production of heavy elements in the Transuranium Element Program, as well as the recovery of plutonium, americium and curium from targets irradiated at the Savannah River Site. Both of these took place at REDC. He was Facility and Program Manager for REDC from 1991 to 1997.

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March 2015
Thursday, March 12, 2015

Niek Schreuder
Vice president and chief medical physicist at Provision Center for Proton Therapy
Proton Therapy

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu items
7:00 p.m. Program - Niek Schreuder, Vice president and chief medical physicist at Provision Center for Proton Therapy - Proton Therapy
Abstract - There is a significant difference between standard (x-ray) radiation treatment and proton therapy. If given in sufficient doses, x-ray radiation techniques will control many cancers, but healthy tissues may receive a similar dose and can be damaged. Both standard x-ray therapy and proton beams work on the principle of selective cell destruction. As a result of protons’ dose-distribution characteristics, the radiation oncologist can increase the dose to a tumor while reducing the dose to surrounding normal tissues.

Bio - Niek Schreuder, M.Sc. DABR, vice president and chief medical physicist, is a board-certified medical physicist with significant experience in all aspects of proton beam radiotherapy.

Most recently, Schreuder served as chief medical physicist and senior vice president of medical physics and technology at ProCure Treatment Centers in Bloomington, Indiana. During his more than 22 years as a medical physicist, he has gained vast experience in project management, research and development and clinical training. He is considered one of the foremost medical physics pioneers in the world specializing in proton therapy.

Prior to joining ProCure, Schreuder was director of medical physics at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI), now called the IU Health Proton Therapy Center, where he was responsible for all medical physics related matters leading to the first patient treatments. He also served as the medical physicist and project manager for the Indiana University (IU) Cyclotron Facility where he led the medical physics design effort associated with developing the MPRI facility. Niek Schreuder trained as a medical Physicist in South Africa and served as a division head of the operations and development division of the Medical Radiation Group at iThemba Laboratories for Accelerator Sciences (tLabs) in South Africa prior to moving to the U.S. in February 2001.

Schreuder has more than 40 published articles in peer-reviewed journals on various aspects of proton beam therapy, has authored and co-authored nearly 100 presentations at international conferences and has taught many courses on proton therapy. As vice president and chief medical physicist at Provision Center for Proton Therapy, Schreuder will be responsible for key aspects of the center’s technical and clinical operations. This includes the commissioning and acceptance testing of all proton therapy and imaging equipment. He will also be responsible for the training of the facility’s staff of physicists, therapists and dosimetrists. Additionally, Schreuder will develop and implement safety programs and quality control measures at the center.

Schreuder earned a BS in radiation physics, a Diploma in Datametrics, and an MS in physical sciences in medical sciences from the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. He has been honored two times with the SABS prize for most outstanding research in the field of radiation dosimetry and received the Meditech prize for the most innovative use of computers. Schreuder is a board-certified medical physicist and is a member of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

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April 2015
Thursday, April 2, 2015

Student Awards Banquet
UT Under Graduate Student Project Teams
2015 UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Dinner

Location: Calhoun's on the River, Knoxville, TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
6:00 p.m. Cash Bar in CBE Banquet Area
6:30 p.m. Program - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Banquet
7:30 p.m. Dinner - Menu




Abstract - The annual UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering student awards banquet will be held at Calhoun’s on the River on April 2, 2015. Traditionally, two student teams are chosen from CBE 411 projects class to present their research or design projects.

This is an excellent opportunity to see the types of research young chemical engineers are performing.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.

RSVP to Rita Gray (rgray22@utk.edu) by Thursday, April x, 2015

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April 2015
Thursday, April 16, 2015

Brian Metzger
Modern Tech
3D Modeling and Engineering

Location: ModernTech, 1626 Downtown West, Knoxville, TN
Cost: $10
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Buddy’s Bar-B-Q at ModernTech
7:00 p.m. Program - Brian Metzger, Modern Tech Inc., 3D Modeling and Engineering

Abstract - Today, our smart phones have more computing power than ALL of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 1969 when it placed two astronauts on the moon. The cost of a smart phone is around $500 while the cost of the computers NASA had at the time was well over $10 million dollars. Quite the disparity, but we all know that as technology evolves, we can get it at a better price with more capabilities. The same is true in design tools. The first computer-aided design (CAD) systems came to market in the 1970’s with a cost in the neighborhood of $150,000 per user with limited 2D functionality. Today, you have access to 3D CAD systems with integrated evaluation tools to simulate real life situations and at a fraction of the cost of the first CAD systems.

Join us at ModernTech where we will explore innovative, easy to use design tools that connect 2D schematics to 3D models for better insight to possible design issues and enable you to model and simulate real world heat transfer and fluid mechanic scenarios for unit design optimization.

Bio - Brian Metzger is an Elite Application Engineer with ModernTech. He began his engineering career at North Carolina State University conducting research on biodiesel production while earning his Master’s degree in Mechanical Engineering. After graduating NCSU he worked at the Savannah River Site on a number of projects to process legacy radiological waste. He then worked at NucSafe in Oak Ridge, TN as the lead mechanical designer for Backscatter X-Ray Imaging technology. Since joining ModernTech in 2013 Brian has specialized in the SolidWorks Simulation suite, including finite element analysis (FEA), computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Injection Molding and Motion Simulation.

 
 
May 2015
Thursday, May 14, 2015

Dr. Joan Markel
Frank H. McClung Museum
Could it be a National Treasure?: Seeking the Story of a Sword

Location: Frank H. McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN - Park along the circle drive in front of the museum (just across from the torchbearer statue). No parking passes are needed. Come in the front door, and a guard will be available to direct you to the correct location.
Dinner location - McClung Museum
Cost: $10
Schedule: 5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Pizza and soft drinks at the Museum
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Joan Markel, Frank H. McClung Museum, Could it be a National Treasure?: Seeking the Story of a Sword

Abstract - The presentation sword of Gen. Orville Babcock had sat in the basement of the McClung Museum for some 30 years when the research initiated for the ‘Battle of Fort Sanders’ exhibit ( opened in 2007) began to unearth a fascinating history. More details than could possibly be hoped for existed in various primary and secondary sources. Discovering the facts, compiling the raw data, assembling the chronology then developing the narrative has resulted in a unique Civil War story with a key Knoxville component, all built around a finely crafted artifact and the relatively forgotten Union officer who owned it.

Bio - Dr. Joan Markel is an archaeologist and educator who has worked at the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Tennessee since 1995; in 2005 she became the Civil War Curator. Joan received her BA in anthropology from the University of Rochester, a Master of Library Science (MLS) from Indiana University, and an MA and Ph.D. in anthropology from the University at Buffalo.

The Markel family moved to Knoxville in 1990 from California, where she was employed in the online information industry. Since arriving in Knoxville, she has taken an interest in local Civil War history, archaeology and in bringing museum resources and expertise to East Tennessee audiences. She is the author of Knoxville in the Civil War, published in 2013 for the Knoxville Civil War Sesquicentennial.

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For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive.