Knoxville - Oak Ridge Local Section
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September 2015
Thursday, September 17, 2015

Don Byerly
Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville
The Last Billion Years: A Geologic History of Tennessee

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Don Byerly, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville - The Last Billion Years: A Geologic History of Tennessee
Abstract - What is now Tennessee has evolved in many ways since the formation of its earliest rock record over a billion years ago. Once part of the supercontinent, Rodinia and then later part of another supercontinent, Pangea, Tennessee’s real estate was ultimately shoved into its present place on the North American supercontinent between 300 and 250 million years ago by plate tectonics. Throughout that long span of “deep time” Tennessee’s landscape slowly evolved to its present form.

Bio - Dr. Don Byerly is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Professor Byerly received the A.B. degree from the College of Wooster and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from UT Knoxville. He taught at UT for 43 years before retiring in 2000.

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October 2015
Thursday, October 22, 2015

Paul Hanson
Corporate Fellow and a Group Leader in the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
The SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) Project

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Paul J. Hanson, Corporate Fellow and a Group Leader in the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, The SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) Project



Abstract - The SPRUCE experiment is a multi-year cooperative interaction among scientists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory operated by UT-Battelle, LLC and the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station, Marcell Experimental Forest.

The SPRUCE experiment is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] – Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.

Experimental work in the 8.1-ha S1 bog will be a climate change manipulation focusing on the combined responses to multiple levels of warming at ambient or elevated CO2 (eCO2) levels. The experiment provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere).

The manipulation will evaluate the response of the existing biological communities to a range of warming levels from ambient to +9°C, provided via large, modified open-top chambers. The ambient and +9°C warming treatments will also be conducted at eCO2 (in the range of 800 to 900 ppm). Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses.

Bio - Dr. Hanson is a Corporate Fellow and a Group Leader in the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science Institute of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dr. Hanson has a B.A. degree in biology from St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minnesota, in 1981, and both M.S. (1983) and Ph.D. (1986) degrees from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul in plant and forest tree physiology. Dr. Hanson’s current research focuses on impacts of climatic change on the physiology, growth, and biogeochemical cycles of North American forest ecosystems. He has authored or co-authored over 160 journal articles and book chapters, and has co-edited (and authored) a book titled “North American Temperate Deciduous Forest Responses to Changing Precipitation Regimes”. Dr. Hanson is currently an Editor of the journal Global Change Biology.

Dr. Paul J. Hanson has over 28 years of experience conducting environmental effects research related to energy technologies and their use. His expertise focuses on the physiological, growth, and biogeochemical cycling responses of woody plant ecosystems, and has encompassed research on acid rain, nitrogen deposition, mercury deposition, ozone effects on woody plants, and environmental and atmospheric change effects associated with precipitation change, elevated CO2 atmospheres, and warming. Dr. Hanson is known for developing manipulative experimental infrastructures for evaluating plant and whole-ecosystem responses to environmental change.

While Dr. Hanson’s career has not involved teaching as a primary activity, since 1986 he has served as a scientific advisor and mentor to more than 25 individuals ranging from students, visiting teachers, postdoctoral researchers, and visiting scientists. In his role as the principal investigator for the DOE-funded SPRUCE warming and CO2 exposure experiment, he fosters opportunities for collaborative research and development with outside University and other Laboratory colleagues.

Dr. Hanson received the 1995 Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2008.

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November 2015
Thursday, November 19, 2015

Brian Davison
Senior Scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Cellulosic Biofuels: Continued Research Challenges During Pioneer Biorefinery Deployment

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - From menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Brian Davison, Senior Scientist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Cellulosic Biofuels: Continued Research Challenges During Pioneer Biorefinery Deployment

Abstract – First generation cellulosic biofuel processes are under development. Although biofuels production has the same key requirements as other existing energy supply chains, biofuels are a unique multi-factorial problem. Consideration must be given to the land used for feedstock production, the feedstocks employed (e.g., dedicated energy crops), the process technologies used (e.g., thermochemical conversion, fermentation), and the products.

In bioenergy, there is a need to accelerate the development and adoption of second and third generation technologies for production and conversion while the first generation technologies are being deployed in several pioneer biorefineries. Modern biotechnology has the potential to impact many aspects of the biomass supply chain. For example, technological advances in feedstock production (e.g., enhancing crop yield by genetic modification or selection of specific natural variants) and process technologies (e.g., development of advanced enzymes or bacteria for the conversion of biomass) will impact future costs of possible biofuel supply chains. Other biotechnological advances may increase the production of fungible biofuels and bioproducts. I will discuss the bioenergy drivers and the biological approaches being taken to address them as well as outline potential game-changers.

However, recalcitrance, or overcoming the inability to easily access the sugars from lignocellulose to make fuels or products, is one of the major challenges for cost-effective biofuel production. The primary goal of the Department of Energy-funded BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is to enable the emergence of a sustainable cellulosic biofuels industry by leading advances in science and innovation resulting in removal of recalcitrance as an economic barrier (www.bioenergycenter.org). BESC is focusing on two hypotheses. First, that this one-step, game-changing strategy can be improved by engineered microbe especially using consolidated bioprocessing. Second, that new biofeedstocks with lowered recalcitrance can be developed.

Bio - Brian H. Davison is Chief Scientist for Systems Biology and Biotechnology, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is the Science Coordinator in the DOE Bioenergy Science Center (www.bioenergycenter.org). He is an Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering and in the Bredesen Center faculty at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. He served as the Director of Life Sciences Division at ORNL (2004-2005). In his thirty years at ORNL he has performed biotechnology research including bioconversion of renewable resources (ethanol, organic acids, solvents), non-aqueous biocatalysis, extractive fermentations, biomass conversion and characterization, and catalytic upgrading of ethanol into fuels. He has over 140 publications and nine patents. He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and his B.S.E. in Chemical Engineering, from the University of Rochester.

He led a multilab team which received an R&D100 Award in 1997 for “Production of Chemicals from Biologically Derived Succinic Acid,” a process now in commercialization. He was the ORNL Science Communicator of 2010 at ORNL for efforts in bioenergy and education. He co-chaired the 15th to 26th Symposia on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals, and served as editor of the Proceedings. He received the 2006 C.D. Scott award by the Society of Industrial Microbiology. He is on the Board of the Society for Biological Engineering and the Editorial Board of the Journal of Industrial Biotechnology.

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December 2015 - Joint Meeting with SWE
Thursday, December 10, 2015

Dr. Pete Ludovice
Georgia Tech
Feel the Power of the Dork Side: A Humorous and Educational Look at Science and Engineering and Their Practitioners

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Executive Committee meeting (all members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Pete Ludovice, Georgia Tech - Feel the Power of the Dork Side: A Humorous and Educational Look at Science and Engineering and Their Practitioners

Abstract - “Feel the Power of the Dork Side” is a hilarious and educational look at science & technology, and their practitioners. Written and performed by Pete Ludovice, the world’s only chemical engineering professor by day and stand-up comedian by night, it will prove that nerds can be funny, and not just funny-looking. www.drpetecomedy.com

The world’s only touring comedian with a Ph.D. from M.I.T., Pete has performed internationally as a comedian for over a decade, and taught Georgia Tech Chemical Engineers for over two decades. His research activities include the computer modeling of synthetic and biological macromolecules, and the use of humor to improve technical innovation, communication, and education (ludovice.chbe.gatech.edu). One of his National Science Foundation projects examines the use of humor in engineering education. He co-directs the Humor Genome Project (humorgenome.org) and the Geekapalooza Comedy Tour (pwp.gatech.edu/geekapalooza ) at Georgia Tech. Pete also hosts "Inside the Black Box," a weekly radio show on science and technology whose motto is “Science, only funnier” (WREK-Atlanta, 91.1FM, insidetheblackbox.org), and a podcast on the intersection of science and the humanities (www.peteandcharlie.libsyn.com/).

Bio - After completing a Ph.D. in chemical engineering at MIT, Pete Ludovice did postdoctoral research at IBM, NASA, and the Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule-Zurich. He joined the chemical & biomolecular engineering faculty at Georgia Tech after managing the polymer products group for Molecular Simulation Inc. (now Accelrys). Pete is currently the director of the Center for Academic Enrichment at Georgia Tech. He has given numerous seminars and workshops for AIChE and other technical organizations on the application of molecular simulation and the use of humorous improvisation to enhance technical innovation.

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January 2016
Thrusday, January 21, 2016

Dr. Bruce Moyer
Distinguished Research Scientist and Group Leader, Chemical Separations Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Diversifying the Supply of Critical Materials for Clean Energy

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking (Cash Bar Available)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Bruce Moyer, Distinguished Research Scientist and Group Leader, Chemical Separations Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Diversifying the Supply of Critical Materials for Clean Energy

Abstract - Clean energy technologies include energy-efficient lighting, electric vehicles, photovoltaic solar panels, and wind power. A major risk to their full implementation lies in the reliability of supply of the critical materials (CMs), upon which such technologies depend. From this standpoint, the US Department of Energy identified five rare earth elements (REEs) as CMs and several other elements, such as lithium, as near-CMs. Various studies in other countries have come to similar conclusions. Despite the current oversupply of REEs, supply risk stems from the lack of diversity in the sources of raw materials as well as in the separations and processing of the materials within the supply chain feeding the manufacture of finished clean-energy products. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the newly funded Critical Materials Institute (CMI) and examine US technology gaps in the supply chain for CMs for clean energy and the technology-development program being undertaken within the CMI to address those gaps. To open new sources of CM, projects seek to improve REE ore beneficiation using froth flotation, to develop methods for recovering REE from phosphate ore, and to find better methods for recovering lithium from geothermal brine. Enhanced separation technologies are being developed to separate adjacent lanthanides, to convert purified intermediates to REE metals and alloys, and to dissolve and separate REE from ore concentrate. A computational effort seeks to substantially accelerate the design of novel separation agents for CM. Taking an indirect tack to diversify the supply of critical REE, we are also developing new uses for the abundant REE, La and Ce, which will improve the economics of recovering and purifying the less abundant critical REE.

Bio - Bruce Moyer holds the position of Distinguished Research Scientist and Group Leader of the Chemical Separations Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He leads the Diversifying Supply Focus Area of the Critical Materials Institute and the Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Research for the US Department of Energy. In his "spare time" he is Co-editor of the journal Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange as well as the book series Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction. His research deals with fundamental and applied aspects of molecular recognition as pertains to separations for critical materials supply, nuclear-fuel recycle, environmental remediation, and waste treatment.

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February 2016 - Joint with ANS
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Dr. Costas Tsouris
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Uranium from Seawater

Location: Calhouns on the River, 400 Neyland Drive, Knoxville, TN 37902
Cost: $25
Schedule:
5:00 pm Executive Committee Meeting (All members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking (Cash Bar Available)
6:30 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Costas Tsouris, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Uranium from Seawater

Abstract - Recent studies have estimated that terrestrial uranium ores can sustain approximately 100 years of nuclear power generation at the current rate of consumption worldwide. Extraction of uranium from seawater has received global attention due to the high overall amount of uranium dissolved in seawater, estimated at over 1000× the amount in terrestrial uranium ores. The challenge comes from the low concentration of uranium in seawater at ~3.3 ppb, which requires processing large amounts of seawater. The most energy-effective approach of recovering uranium from seawater is through uranium-selective adsorbents deployed in seawater of sufficient flow currents for extended periods of time. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program, has established a Fuel Resources Program to focus on the development of uranium-selective adsorbents and investigate uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to secure fuel for future nuclear energy production and put a price cap on the cost of uranium. This presentation will describe the DOE-NE Fuel Resources Program and highlight its accomplishments so far.

Bio - Costas Tsouris holds a joint appointment with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Georgia Institute of Technology. He specializes in chemical processing and recently on:

  • Separations for energy applications, such as separations processes focused on nuclear fuel production and reprocessing, including uranium recovery from seawater and separations of off-gas produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing

  • Process intensification - process innovation of novel chemical processes focused on enhancing process efficiency by using electric, magnetic, and gravity fields and by combining unit operations such as mixing, reaction, separation, heat transfer, etc.

  • Capacitive deionization, a desalination process based on the electrosorption of ions by nanostructured carbon materials.


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March 2016 - Joint Meeting with UT
Thursday, March 17, 2016

Kasey Krouse
UT
Urban Forestry Program

Location: 2506 Jacob Drive, Knoxville TN 37996-4542, UT Institute of Agriculture, Center for Renewable Carbon (CRC), BeST Conference Room (103)
Cost: $10
Schedule:
5:00-6:00pm Arrival and tour of facilities
6:00 p.m. Food & drinks with poster presentations by graduate and undergraduate students
6:30 p.m. Brief welcome by CRC Director
7:00 p.m. Program - Kasey Krouse, UT - Urban Forestry Program
Abstract - People come from around the world each year to visit the forests of East Tennessee. These forests are known for species diversification and brilliant tree specimens. The trees of East Tennessee help identify the region as thriving in natural resources and rich from the benefits those trees provide. East Tennessee is where northern deciduous forests meet the southern temperate forests, and various precipitation patterns occur over a range of altitudes which makes the City of Knoxville a perfect environmental canvas for a distinguishing urban forest.

The concept of Urban Forestry is not new to Knoxville. The City of Knoxville and local folks have been planting trees for years for multiple reasons. Through time, the understanding of tree benefits and the importance of trees has greatly evolved. Trees are no longer only valued for their beauty and shade, but a new wave of environmental, economic, and social benefits are being recognized. Trees are one of the few City assets that increase in value through time. The City of Knoxville has recognized the importance of properly investing in trees, and has developed an Urban Forestry Division through the Public Service Department to plant, manage, and protect these valuable assets

A presentation on the City of Knoxville Urban Forestry Program will be given. The presentation will cover the programs mission and objectives and include discussion of the protection, maintenance, and preservation of trees throughout the City, as well as upcoming projects and goals for the coming year.

Bio - As the Urban Forester for the City of Knoxville, Tennessee, Mr. Krouse is responsible for the expansion, protection, and maintenance of the City’s urban forest and implementing the City’s Urban Forest Management Plan. He is charged with updating and overseeing and providing advice on policy, specifications, and programs as it relates to public trees within the City of Knoxville.

As the Urban Forester, Mr. Krouse oversees the City’s planting projects, adhering to proper tree installation and follow-up maintenance. Mr. Krouse is also responsible for responding to resident concerns about hazardous trees throughout the City, and conducting tree risk assessments to determine proper mitigation for high risk situations specific to public trees. He is also responsible for the development and implementation of public education events that relate to the City’s urban forest. As the Urban Forester, he will work with residents as well as local, state and federal stakeholders to expand urban forestry resources within the City. Mr. Krouse is a Certified Arborist and Municipal Specialist (IN-3243AM) with the International Society of Arboriculture.

Mr. Krouse worked as a consultant and project manager for six years with Davey Resource Group where he has assessed thousands of trees throughout the eastern United States, to determine tree condition, health, risk factors, and maintenance needs. As an urban forestry consultant, Mr. Krouse has also performed individual tree risk analysis, tree and shrub landscape appraisals, and conducted tree forensic consultations. While a consultant with Davey Resource Group, Mr. Krouse conducted wetland delineations, managed invasive species control projects for forest, upland, and aquatic habitats, and was involved in several wetlands enhancement and restoration projects throughout the Midwest.

Education
• B.S., Biological Sciences (Urban Forestry), 2006, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

Certifications/Special Training
• Certified Arborist and Municipal Specialist (IN-3243AM), International Society of Arboriculture, January, 2007
• Davey Institute of Tree Sciences, 2010, Davey Tree Expert Company, Kent, Ohio
• Wetlands Delineation Training, 2010, Wetlands Training Institute, Toledo, Ohio
• Forest Inventory and Analysis Training, Phase 2 Inventory Plots, United States Forest Service, November, 2007
• Introduction Knoxville, February, 2013
• Knoxville CAC Community Leadership Class 2015

Professional Organizations
• International Society of Arboriculture
• International Society of Arboriculture Southern Chapter
• Society of Municipal Arborists
• Tennessee Urban Forest Council
• Keep Knoxville Beautiful- Beautification Committee

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April 2015
Thursday, April 14, 2016

Harold “Lee” Dobbs
University of Tennessee
Energy Choices and Consequences

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $20 (cash or check)
Optional Payment Method: $22.09 (Credit Card) online payment at the Eventbrite.com payment processing site.
Schedule:
5:00 p.m. Executive Committee Meeting (All members welcome)
5:30 p.m. Social/Networking (Cash Bar Available)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu
7:00 p.m. Program - Harold “Lee” Dobbs, University of Tennessee, Energy Choices and Consequences

Abstract - With the world's population approaching nine billion by the year 2040, achieving a healthy lifestyle for all people on earth will depend, in part, on the availability of affordable energy, especially electricity. This presentation addresses the various options for producing and using electricity, and the consequences associated with each option. The options include fossil, renewables, nuclear, and conservation. All energy options are needed, but some options may be better than others when compared in the following areas: economics, environmental effects, public health and safety, sustainability, and politics.

Bio - Dr. H. L. (Lee) Dodds is IBM Professor of Engineering and Department Head, Emeritus, in the University of Tennessee Nuclear Engineering (UTNE) Department. He joined UTNE in 1976 after working for the DuPont Company at the Savannah River Laboratory for six years. He began serving as UTNE Department Head in early 1997 and retired in December 2011. He also previously worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Dr. Dodds earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering at UT. He has served as a consultant for the U.S. Department of Energy and several American, Canadian, and Dutch research institutes and companies. He currently serves on the External Advisory Boards for the nuclear engineering programs at The Ohio State University and Virginia Commonwealth University. He is also a past member of the Accreditation Board of the National Academy for Nuclear Training, which is part of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, a current member of the National Board of Directors of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), and a past member of the National Board of Directors of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Dr. Dodds has received many awards including the ANS Arthur Holly Compton National Teaching Award. He is a Licensed Professional Engineer in Tennessee and a Fellow of ANS

 
 
April 2016
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

CBE Honors Awards Banquet

2016 UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Honors Awards Banquet

Location: Southern Depot, 318 West Depot Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37917
Cost: $20
Schedule:
6:00 p.m. Social
6:45 p.m. Welcome - UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Awards Banquet
7:00 p.m. Dinner - Menu




Abstract - The annual UT Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering student awards banquet will be held at the Southern Depot on April 20, 2016. Traditionally, two student teams are chosen from CBE 411 projects class to present their research or design projects.

This is an excellent opportunity to see the types of research young chemical engineers are performing.

Area high school chemistry students and their teachers are especially welcome to this meeting, which will provide an opportunity for high school students with interests in chemistry and engineering to learn more about opportunities in chemical engineering.
Hope to see you there.

RSVP to Rita Gray (rgray22@utk.edu) by Thursday, April 15, 2016

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May 2016
Thursday, May 19, 2016

Dr. Stephanie Drumheller-Horton
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Frank H. McClung Museum
Not Just Living Fossils: Crocodylian Evolution and Diversity from the Age of Dinosaurs to the Present

Location: Rothchild Catering and Conference Center, 8807 Kingston Pike, Knoxville TN
Cost: $10 (Cash or Check – NOTE: There is no cost for the program or PDH Certificate)
Optional Payment Method: $11.54 (Credit Card) online payment at the Eventbrite.com payment processing site.
Schedule:
5:30 p.m. AIChE Executive Committee Meeting (All members welcome)
6:00 p.m. Dinner - Pizza and soft drinks at the Museum
7:00 p.m. Program - Dr. Stephanie Drumheller-Horton, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Frank H. McClung MuseumNot Just Living Fossils: Crocodylian Evolution and Diversity from the Age of Dinosaurs to the Present

Abstract - Many of us have heard, at one time or another, that alligators and crocodiles are living fossils, unchanged since the time of the dinosaurs. However, a study of the group's fossil record reveals that this couldn't be further from the truth. Ancient crocodilians and their relatives included species that walked on two legs, others which were fully marine, some that ate only plants, and true giants, who could grow longer than a school bus. Come learn about the surprising history of this often understudied group.

Bio - Professor Drumheller-Horton’s received her PhD from The University of Iowa in 2012 from the Department of Geoscience. Her Dissertation was entitled: An actualistic and phylogenetic approach to identifying and interpreting crocodilian bite marks. Her research interests center on vertebrate taphonomy, ichnology, paleopathology, and paleoecology. In particular, she studies bone surface modifications generated under modern and experimental conditions to better understand the processes which left similar traces on bone in the fossil record. Her current projects include:
• Testing methods for applying these modern analogies in a deep time perspective.
• Interpreting trophic interactions, behavior, and diet of different archosaurian groups.
• Identifying and differentiating historically understudied traces and pathologies, such as bite marks, shell disease, and plant or fungi mediated damage to bone.

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For previous event descriptions, please review the Calendar Archive.