About JUMP

JUMP (Join the discussion, Unveil innovation, Make connections, Promote tech-to-market) into STEM is an online building science competition for undergraduate and graduate students at U.S. colleges and universities. JUMP into STEM aims to attract bright students from a variety of majors to building science. The JUMP into STEM initiative seeks to inspire the next generation of building scientists, focusing on creative ideation and diversity in the building science field. The diversity objective is inclusive of an interdisciplinary mix of majors and representation by women and minorities. JUMP into STEM attracts students from majors such as computer science, data science, statistics, mathematics, physics, economics, sociology, meteorology, architecture, and various engineering disciplines in addition to the traditional building professional degrees of civil and mechanical engineering.

Building science is an exciting technical field that encompasses technologies, services, procedures, and policies supportive of advancing buildings-as-a-system, grid modernization, artificial intelligence, carbon-reduction technologies, the digital economy, and the internet of things. There is a need for an increased number of graduates from building science programs in undergraduate, graduate, and vocational settings to cover workforce gaps in buildings specializations. Additionally, there is a need for graduates of these programs to come from a variety of backgrounds. Buildings are used almost every day by all members of U.S. society. Diversity among buildings professionals will help the industry cover the spectrum in understanding behaviors and needs building occupants.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories are uniquely positioned to make an impact on building science education. National laboratories, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), have strong teams consisting of expert researchers who are developing technologies and conducting research that will pave the way for the next generation of buildings. These buildings are highly efficient but can also interact with the grid. This knowledge base can be used to develop programs to attract bright students toward building science.

History

JUMP started as an online crowdsourcing community, launched by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2015, designed to motivate engagement in STEM field research and innovation through challenges sponsored by industry and the national labs. Since 2015, the JUMP community has garnered more than 1,400 registered users, with the majority represented by students and small businesses.

Today, JUMP into STEM directs its focus towards students and engages university and college professors from various departments to promote JUMP into STEM challenges as either a modular component for course work or extracurricular development opportunities. A successful pilot ran January–March 2018, culminating in selection of a winner invited to ORNL for a paid summer internship.

Since the 2018 pilot, ORNL has been collaborating with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to offer more JUMP into STEM challenges and a final event competition in April 2019. Three winners were awarded paid summer internships at ORNL or NREL for summer 2019. Internships will continue to be awarded to winners. Be sure to visit the JUMP into STEM Terms and Conditions for specific rules and requirements. Also review the JUMP into STEM Building Technologies Internship Program (BTIP) application criteria. Applications for summer internships must be submitted at the same time as idea submissions. Students are still eligible for internships at ORNL and NREL even if they do not become a finalist or winner through the regular internship application process.

This initiative is being funded by the DOE Building Technologies Office





Be sure to visit the ORNL and NREL social media pages to learn more about the national labs and their ongoing research!
ORNL: Facebook | Twitter | Flickr
NREL: Facebook | Twitter | Flickr