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Human Genome Project Budget

U.S. Human Genome Project Funding
($Millions)
FY DOE NIH* U.S. Total
1988 10.7 17.2 27.9
1989 18.5 28.2 46.7
1990 27.2 59.5 86.7
1991 47.4 87.4 134.8
1992 59.4 104.8 164.2
1993 63.0 106.1 169.1
1994 63.3 127.0 190.3
1995 68.7 153.8 222.5
1996 73.9 169.3 243.2
1997 77.9 188.9 266.8
1998 85.5 218.3 303.8
1999 89.9 225.7 315.6
2000 88.9 271.7 360.6
2001 86.4 308.4 394.8
2002
90.1
346.7
434.3
2003
64.2
372.8
437
Note: These numbers do not include construction funds, which are a very small part of the budget.

The Human Genome Project was sometimes reported to have cost $3 billion. However, this figure refers to the total projected funding over a 13-year period (1990–2003) for a wide range of scientific activities related to genomics. These include studies of human diseases, experimental organisms (such as bacteria, yeast, worms, flies, and mice); development of new technologies for biological and medical research; computational methods to analyze genomes; and ethical, legal, and social issues related to genetics. Human genome sequencing represents only a small fraction of the overall 13-year budget.

The DOE and NIH genome programs set aside 3% to 5% of their respective total annual budgets for the study of the project's ELSI issues. For an in-depth look at the ELSI surrounding the project, see the ELSI Webpage.

* For an explanation of the NIH budget, contact the Office of Human Genome Communications, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health; 301/402-0911.

See also a Table of major government and nonprofit genomics research funders, 1998-2000 compiled as part of the World Survey of Genomics Research of the Stanford-in-Washington Program.

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.