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Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Program

Human Genome News Archive Edition
Vol.11, No. 3-4   July 2001
Available in PDF
 
In this issue...

In the News

Comparative Genomics

Mouse

Web, Publications, Resources

Funding

Meeting Calendars & Acronyms

  • Genome and Biotechnology Meetings
  • Training Courses and Workshops
  • Acronyms

HGN archives and subscriptions

Human Genome Project Information home

HGMIS Notes

HGP Fact Sheet Published
Updating articles drawn from the November 2000 issue of Human Genome News, the Human Genome Management Information System (HGMIS) has published the 4-page Human Genome Project Fact Sheet to provide quick and timely answers to frequently asked questions. Topics include gene patenting, the "rivalry" between public and private sectors, HGP funding since 1987, and challenges for the future. This free document is available in bulk for meetings and educational purposes (865/576-6669, mansfieldbk@ornl.gov).

HGP Handouts
HGMIS will send multiple copies of HGN and other genomics-related materials to relevant meetings on request and without charge. (865/576-6669, mansfieldbk@ornl.gov).

HGMIS Requests Change of Address, Subscription Status
After each issue of HGN is printed and mailed, many copies are returned to HGMIS because the addressee has moved. Some subscribers may wish to drop their print subscriptions. Please notify HGMIS via of a change in address or subscription status or to request information.

HGMIS Documents, Web Site Win Awards
The DOE Microbial Genome Program Report, produced by HGMIS, won a number of awards in the 2000 2001 competitions sponsored by the Society for Technical Communication (STC). HGMIS was initiated in 1989 by DOE to make information about the Human Genome Project accessible to many audiences.

In the STC East Tennessee Chapter (ETC) competition, the microbial report received a Distinguished (first place) Award in Online Communications and two Merit (third place) Awards, one in Technical Publications and the other in Technical Art. In addition, the document was judged ETC's Best of Show in Online Communications and went on to receive another Distinguished Award at the international level. Only first place winners in chapter competitions were eligible for the international contest.

A HGMIS entry in the News and Trade Articles category, "Genes, Dreams, and Reality: The Promises and Risks of the New Genetics" by Denise Casey, won a Merit Award in Technical Publications. The article appeared in the journal Judicature 83(3).

STC, the largest organization of its type in the world, is dedicated to advancing the arts and sciences of technical communication. Its 25,000 members include writers, editors, illustrators, printers, publishers, educators, students, engineers, and scientists employed in a variety of technological fields.

Web Awards
HGMIS also has received numerous awards and recognitions for its Human Genome Project Information Web site. Some recent ones are from Scientific American, Schoolsnet, BigChalk, KidsHealth, CyberU, sciLINKs, Geniusfind, ISI, Hardin MD, Awesome Library, and ResPool Research Network.

Images
High-quality, original graphics can be downloaded from the HGMIS Web site. No permission is needed, but please let HGMIS know where they were used. https://public.ornl.gov/site/gallery/

Please cite the U.S. Department of Energy Human Genome Progam and list the Web site's home page.

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The electronic form of the newsletter may be cited in the following style:
Human Genome Program, U.S. Department of Energy, Human Genome News (v11n3-4).

Human Genome Project 1990–2003

The Human Genome Project (HGP) was an international 13-year effort, 1990 to 2003. Primary goals were to discover the complete set of human genes and make them accessible for further biological study, and determine the complete sequence of DNA bases in the human genome. See Timeline for more HGP history.

Human Genome News

Published from 1989 until 2002, this newsletter facilitated HGP communication, helped prevent duplication of research effort, and informed persons interested in genome research.